Hawk Owl


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Related to Hawk Owl: eagle owl

Hawk Owl

 

(Surnia ulula), a bird of the order Strigiformes. The body length is 36–41 cm, and the weight, 250–360 g. The females are larger than the males. The head is relatively small, and the facial disk is incomplete. The wings are long and pointed, the long tail is sharply graduated, and the tarsometatarsi and toes are densely feathered. The plumage is brown, with white spots on the upper parts; the underparts are light, with dark transverse stripes, as in hawks (hence the name). The bill is yellow.

The hawk owl is distributed in northern Europe, Asia, and North America. In the USSR it is found in the forest zone as far east as Kamchatka and Sakhalin and in the spruce forests of the Tien-Shan. It is either sedentary, or it wanders in the winter. It inhabits tall-trunked forests. It nests in tree hollows or on the tops of broken trunks, or it occupies the nests of other birds. The clutch usually contains three or four eggs, and in years when food is abundant it contains as many as seven to nine. The hawk owl hunts in the morning and the evening for rodents, more rarely for birds.

References in periodicals archive ?
The students working on Jungle Hawk Owl have now since graduated, although some continue to work on the drone as part of graduate research.
Caption: Hoburg and his team at MIT ready the Jungle Hawk Owl for its first flight.
Prior to March 1994, GNP files contained only 4 sight records of the Northern Hawk Owl: 1 questionable report from August 1989; 2 in 1991 (January and September); and 1 in January 1994.
Plucking of dead prey by the Northern Hawk Owl has previously been described by Kertel (1986), Nero (1995), and Duncan and Duncan (2014).
The Northern Hawk Owl is an irruptive species believed to temporarily extend its breeding range south in response to environmental change, such as fire and food availability (Duncan and Duncan 2014).
The Northern Hawk Owl was considered a rare species in Montana (Wright 1996), but after many records it was removed from the rare bird list in 2005 by the Montana Bird Records Committee.
Turns out they were wildlife biologists tagging northern hawk owls. They'd approach a perched hawk owl on a telephone pole, and cast a mouse attached to the fishing line under its pole.
Many winters back in Fairbanks, Alaska, there was a funny story in the newspaper about hawk owls. With snow piled up high on both sides, the main highway was like a canyon.
Until the hawk owl arrived, regional notice had been largely avoided in the town since two proposed landfill projects were abandoned in the 1980s and 1990s.
Though irruptive hawk owls are known to take mostly birds as prey, Root's hawk owl took only rodents.
Whether or not a northern hawk owl will quarter in Root again is a complicated question.
The few hawk owls visiting New York often remain on winter quarters for extended periods.