Hawksbill Turtle


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Hawksbill Turtle

 

(Eretmochelys imbricata), a reptile of the family Chelonidae. The length of the shell is up to 85 cm. The dorsal shield is dark brown or chestnut colored with a yellow or rose design of spots and rays; the ventral shield is yellow.

The hawksbill turtle is found in all tropical and subtropical seas. It feeds on mollusks and fish, and partly on water plants. It leaves the water only during reproduction. Each year the female hawksbill turtles deposit more than 100 eggs on low sandy banks. The development lasts approximately 60 days. The horny shields which cover the hawksbill turtle’s shell (known as tortoiseshell) are highly valued and have long been an object of commerce. Hawksbill turtles are caught on the shore during reproduction, often before they can deposit their eggs. As a result of increased annihilation, the number of hawksbill turtles has decreased sharply. The flesh is not used as food.

References in periodicals archive ?
Population study of the hawksbill turtle Eretmochelys imbricata (Cheloniidae) in the southern Pacific region of Colombia.
They support an important spectrum of marine life including seabirds and migratory waders, a large population of endangered hawksbill turtles, and dugongs.
These habitats support an important spectrum of marine life including seabirds and migratory waders, a large population of critically endangered hawksbill turtles, and dugongs.
This year, EWS and WWF started tagging post-nesting female Hawksbill turtles in the Daymaniyat Islands on April 12.
2017) analyzed 33 years of nesting records for the hawksbill turtle from nine sites along the eastern Pacific.
Carlos Diez catches a critically endangered Hawksbill Turtle to gather data for its conservation
The 10 green turtles are among the 35 green turtles and one hawksbill turtle seized from a fish raft in Sok Kwu Wan Fish Culture Zone on September 30.
Connecting international conservation priorities with human wellbeing in low-income nations: lessons from hawksbill turtle conservation in El Salvador.
KUWAIT, Nov 25 (KUNA) -- Kuwait Scientific Center affiliated to Kuwait Foundation for Advancement of Sciences (KFAS) has recently released three green turtles and a hawksbill turtle into the sea, putting the animals back in their natural habitat in the Kuwait waters.
Bahrain's territorial waters host a range of marine turtles of which three are predominant, the green turtle (Chelonia mydas), the hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) and the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta).
While the aquarium's rescue of the turtle is an important and inspiring story, the fate of Hawksbill turtle population in the Red Sea is cause for alarm, he added.
Under stress due to decades of increased human activity, pollution and natural threats in the Gulf, the hawksbill turtle has been a source of concern for environmentalists who have closely monitored the annual migration of the well-travelled sea creatures.