Hazarajat

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Hazarajat

 

mountains in the eastern part of the Iranian Plateau in Afghanistan, located primarily in the basins of two rivers, the Hari Rud and the Farah Rud. The Hazarajat, a system of desolate ranges of primarily moderate elevation, measures approximately 600 km in length and up to 300 km in width. It rises to a maximum elevation of 4,182 m in the Koh-i-Hesar. The ranges, which are composed mainly of limestones and shales, fan out from the western extremity of the Hindu Kush, gradually becoming lower toward the west and southwest. Semidesert with ephemeral sagebrush predominates to elevations of 2,400 m, with occasional thin forests of pistachio. Higher there is frigana (xerophytic shrub and semishrub vegetation) with groves of juniper; dry steppes occur on leveled segments. There are oases at the foot of the mountains.

References in periodicals archive ?
From the Hazaristan With Haiku Body and a Yellow Mandela
Poets Ahmad Al Shahawy​ (Egypt), Adnan Ozer​ (Turkey) and Kamran Mir Hazar​(Hazaristan)
The other part of the Hazaras that remained in Afghanistan fled the cities and escaped to the mountains of the central highlands of Afghanistan that is known today as Hazarajat or Hazaristan.
Up to now, hundreds of Hazaras who have been traveling from Kabul and other parts of Afghanistan to Hazaristan have been killed by the Taliban.
The Hazaras of Afghanistan The Hazara people, one of the largest ethnic groups, live mostly in the countryside of the central highlands of Afghanistan, which are called Hazaristan or Hazarajat.
And when they got control of Hazaristan, they killed a large number of the Hazara people in Mazar-e-Sharif, Bamiyan, and in other parts of Hazaristan.
Not-allowing Uzbek, Turkmen and Baloch people to educate in their own languages; burning Turkic books; destroying ancient Buddha sculptures of Bamiyan, Hazaristan; banning of Navruz celebration that does not belong to Afghan culture; and changing the name of cities, districts and villages are other examples.
Stream of Deer reflects the voice of a freely-speaking poet from Hazaristan (Afghanistan), Kamran Mir Hazar.
The anthology begins with the absorbing piece named MY NAME IS FATIMA OF HAZARISTAN, penned by Etnairis Ribera from Puerto Rico.
The cover features a representation of the flag of Hazaristan and an image of the ancient Buddha sculpture of Bamiyan, a principal symbol of Hazara history and culture.
• Robert Maier, author, educator, filmmaker (USA)• Kamran Mir Hazar, poet, journalist and webmaster (Norway/ Hazaristan)• Gertrude Fester, educator, writer and poet (South Africa/Rwanda) • Emdee David,- Writer, Producer and Director- Africa Entertainment Network (Nigeria)• Fernando Rendon, poet, director of International Poetry Festival of Medellin, Alternative Nobel Prize 2006 (Colombia)• Canela A.
He supported The Hazaristan Defiance under the Tanzeem Platform which