Hazel Hen

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Related to Hazel Grouse: ruffed grouse
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Hazel Hen

 

(Tetrastes bonasia), a bird of the family Tetraonidae of the order Galliformes. The hazel hen is 35–37 cm long and weighs 350–500 g. The wings are short and blunt. The hazel hen takes wing noisily and flies only short distances. The toes and the lower part of the metatarsus are naked. The plumage is reddish gray with mottling; the coloration of hazel hens living in Siberia is a purer gray.

The hazel hen is distributed in Europe and Asia. In the USSR it is found in the forest zone from the Carpathians to Sakhalin; it is not encountered in the Caucasus or Kamchatka. Hazel hens are sedentary birds, making only short food-seeking journeys. They live in pairs in humid dense coniferous (spruce and fir) and mixed forests. The birds nest on the ground. A clutch contains six to ten eggs, which are incubated by the female for about three weeks. Six weeks after hatching, the young reach adult size. They feed at first on insects and later on plant substances. In the winter the hazel hen feeds on the catkins of birch and alder trees; it spends the night in the snow. In the summer the bird feeds principally on berries, seeds, insects, and the green parts of plants. The hazel hen is a valuable commercial bird.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2016) used Finnish wildlife triangle census data to show that reproductive success of capercaillie, black grouse and hazel grouse decreased with mammalian predator density.
Nest loss and chick mortality in capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus) and hazel grouse (Bonasa bonasia) in West Carpathians.--Folia Zool.
1988 Sweden black grouse capercaillie hazel grouse willow ptarmigan Baines 1991 UK black grouse Lawrence and Silvy 1995 USA Attwater's prairie-chicken Baines 1996 UK black grouse Kauhala et al.2000 Finland black grouse capercaillie hazel grouse willow ptarmigan Baxter et al.
Large-scale synchrony in the dynamics of Capercaillie, Black Grouse, and Hazel Grouse populations in Finland.
Otherwise, black grouse and hazel grouse Bonasa bonasia had a significantly greater proportion of total hits in BIOSIS than in WOS, blue grouse Dendragapus obscurus and spruce grouse Dendragapus canadensis vice versa.
Thus, in the case of woodland grouse, BIOSIS returned more hits for two Old-World species (black and hazel grouse) while WOS favoured two New-World species (blue and spruce grouse).
At first blush, the increased focus on Old-World woodland grouse seems not to fit this pattern, because all three (capercaillie, black grouse and hazel grouse) are classed by the IUCN (2010) as of Least Concern but have high weightings (see Table 3).
The study species is the hazel grouse Bonasa bonasia, a habitat specialist with poor dispersal ability and therefore likely to be strongly affected by habitat fragmentation (Andren 1994, With & Crist 1995).
We selected the area because it is subjected to constant changes in land usage, both in terms of forest practices and anthropogenic development, all of which may fragment areas suitable for hazel grouse.
The hazel grouse is spread throughout the Palearctic boreal region in temperate and mountainous forests (Storch 2000).
The hazel grouse is a highly site-faithful species that is found in a wide variety of habitat types throughout its range.
Ecological niche factor analysis (ENFA) is a multivariate approach that has been used to determine the geographic distribution of suitable habitat for hazel grouse from map data such as satellite images (Hirzel et al.