Heart of Darkness


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Heart of Darkness

adventure tale of journey into heart of the Belgian Congo and into depths of man’s heart. [Br. Lit.: Heart of Darkness, Magill III, 447–449]
See: Journey
References in periodicals archive ?
| Why is imitating the dog staging Heart of Darkness? What's interesting about the novel is how much it has influenced other novels, and films - Apocalypse Now, for example.
"Heart of Darkness" is considered to be one of the early English novels that takes place in Congo.
According to The Congo Diary some of the characters in the novel Heart of Darkness are quite close to actual people.
Heart of Darkness is the most crystallized example of this fool's errand.
Now a best-selling author and speaker, Melissa Moore endured an early, intimate encounter with the heart of darkness. Her father, Keith Jesperson, was a serial killer who murdered at least eight women while Moore was a child.
Critics have also identified possible models of influence in officers, naturalists, explorers, and colonial agents who went to the Congo, the presumed setting of "Heart of Darkness" (1899), or were otherwise involved in its colonization: Leopold II, David Livingstone, Guillaume Van Kerckhoven, Cecil Rhodes, Charles Stokes, Roger Casement, Richard Burton, Georges Antonies Klein, Arthur Hodister, Eduard Schnitzer "Emin Pasha," Edmund Barttelot, Charles Henry Stokes, Carl Peters, Paul Voulet, James Sligo Jameson, Henry Morgan Stanley, and Leon Rom.
Dryden is certainly warranted in asserting as much: Seymour's and Delbanco's studies are indeed largely biographical in nature, while Dryden's book is steeped in exploring the myriad ways important works by Wells and Conrad such as Heart of Darkness, The Secret Agent, and Tono-Bungay reveal a heavy debt each author owed the other.
A father's search for his missing daughter takes the "little girl lost" scenario to gruesome extremes in "The World of Kanako," a relentlessly unpleasant and ultimately banal journey into a broken family's heart of darkness. Writer-director Tetsuya Nakashima explored many of these same themes in "Confessions," but here he amplifies every element --the spastic style, the baroque plotting, the parental dysfunction and the hidden malice that poisons adolescent life.
Drawing on Porter's own writings and the accounts of eyewitnesses, "Mad for Glory: A Heart of Darkness in the War of 1812" by Robert Booth memorably recounts the events of a dark and fatal voyage in which David Porter crosses the line from commander to cult-leader, from improbable fantasy to disastrous reality.
As the tale charts the gradual degeneration and, finally, the deaths of two incompetent agents (representatives of the Great Trading Company) the narrative"s cool indictment of these "pioneers of trade and progress" anticipates the more profound and sophisticated web of ironies that would inform Heart of Darkness two years later.
For whatever else anyone might want to read into it, ''Heart of Darkness'' is pretty respectful of humanity.

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