Hearth


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

hearth

the bottom part of a metallurgical furnace in which the molten metal is produced or contained
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Hearth

That part of the floor directly in front of the fireplace, and the floor inside the fireplace on which the fire is built, made of fire-resistant masonry.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Hearth

 

a furnace for smelting, resmelting, and heating metals and firing ceramic products; the lower part of a shaft furnace in which fuel is combusted.

Hearths have been known since approximately the third millennium B.C. The so-called direct-process hearths found on the territory of the USSR date from the first millennium B.C. Forge hearths served to heat metals before forging and hardening. Pottery hearths or kilns were used to fire pottery. Bloomeries for the conversion of pig iron into iron have been known since the 15th century.

In modern terms, the hearth is an industrial furnace wider than it is high (when the height is greater than the width, the furnace is called a shaft furnace). The hearth consists of a steel chamber lined inside with brick and open at the top. The side walls of the hearth have openings or tuyeres to deliver air. Gaseous products of combustion are disposed of through the open top of the hearth or through an exhaust pipe. A hearth can operate on charcoal, coke, oil, or gas. Ordinarily, the efficiency of hearths does not exceed 5 percent, with the result that they have not found widespread industrial use. Crucible hearths are used in metallurgy for crucible melting of metals, and specially designed hearths are used to obtain lead from ore concentrates.


Hearth

 

(1) An open flat space for kindling and maintaining a fire, usually inside a dwelling. According to archaeological evidence, hearths have been known since the Lower Paleolithic. In the Upper Paleolithic, hearths were often constructed of stones and sometimes coated with clay.

In round dwellings the hearth is usually located in the center of the dwelling, as in the chums of the Nentsy, Evenki, and other peoples of the North; in rectangular dwellings it is near a wall, usually opposite the entrance, as in the houses of some peoples of Dagestan. A transitional type of construction is the hearth placed directly against the wall with a clay-coated wicker pipe for the smoke (among some peoples of the Balkan Peninsula, Siberia, the Caucasus, and Middle Asia). In time the hearth against the wall developed into the fireplace.

The hearth played an important role in various rituals. Among many peoples—including the ancient Greeks, Romans, Slavs, Teutons, and, until recent times, the peoples of the Caucasus and Siberia—it was considered a sacred place in the dwelling.

(2) In a figurative sense, hearth means home, shelter, or the family (the home hearth).

(3) A source from which something, such as a cultural influence, emanates.


Hearth

 

(or bottom), the part of a furnace on which the materials or items undergoing heat treatment (heating, melting, or annealing) are placed.

Hearths of melting furnaces are usually made of refractory materials. Electric-arc furnaces may be constructed with current-conducting hearths, in which case the hearth is one of the electrodes. Hearths of heating furnaces usually also have a refractory lining. A distinction is made between stationary, bogie, moveable, revolving, and roller-hearth furnaces. In multideck, or multihearth, drying and annealing furnaces, the hearths are placed at various levels along the vertical axis of the furnace, and the material being processed pours down from one hearth to another.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

What does it mean when you dream about a hearth?

The hearth signifies a place to return to home values and nurturing feelings. It is traditionally the center of sacred beginnings and also of sacred rituals. It also represents a chance to begin again.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

hearth

[härth]
(building construction)
The floor of a fireplace or brick oven.
The projection in front of a fireplace, made of brick, stone, or cement.
(metallurgy)
The floor of a reverberatory, open-hearth, cupola, or blast furnace; it is made of refractory material able to support the charge and to collect the molten products.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hearth

1. The floor of a fireplace (usually brick, tile, or stone) together with an adjacent area of fireproof material.
2. An area permanently floored with fireproof material beneath and surrounding a stove.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hearth

symbol of home life. [Folklore: Jobes, 738]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wollenberg will be responsible for managing financial performance and developing operational and capital plans for Windhaven and The Hearth Insurance Group.
The phrase "home and hearth" is somewhat vague in its meaning today, but it reflects the need for shelter and place to prepare one's food.
After several years of barbecue manufacturers expanding product lines to include smaller, more mobile grills, hearth manufacturers this year present smaller hearths for the home, as well as patio.
Many of the other contributors to Hearth seek a "rooted relatedness" to something larger than the self (Carl Safina), a sense of becoming in "deep time" (Mary Evelyn Tucker), or alternative "narrative mappings" (Boey Kim Cheng).
Since 2008, Hearth has developed senior housing and market-rate apartment projects in Lindstrom, Mahtomedi, Maplewood, Mounds View, Little Canada, Prescott, Wisconsin, and other locations east of the Mississippi River.
I'm in no rush, I'm busy now so it's all go, go, go." Gavin James launched the Bord na Mona Hearth Sessions, a series of intimate fireside gigs, in a search for the best Irish pubs with cosy fires.
Positive Deviance Hearth monitoring system in Migori only assesses program treatment, one of the three PD Hearth objectives.
This autumn, Hearth talks and authors will focus on Welsh writing, although all talks will be in English.
There will be a sale of local fleeces, competitions, music from a Northumbrian piper, and an opportunity for people to join spinning and knitting circles Refreshments will be provided all day by The Hearth Cafe and the Lion and Lamb public house, and organisers say they hope to attract the curious to take a trip to Horsley with their friends and family, to find out more about local wool and to discover the beautiful Northumberland village of Horsley, which is just off the A69.
Under the new tax, for each hearth or fireplace in a house, the owner or tenant paid one shilling (5p) twice a year at Michaelmas and Lady Day.
Stone hearths of Manas are considered archaeological monuments.