Heat Resistance

heat resistance

[′hēt ri‚zis·təns]
(electronics)

Heat Resistance

 

the ability of building materials (mainly metal, but also ceramic and polymeric materials) to withstand mechanical stress without substantial deformations and without failure at high temperatures. Heat resistance is determined by a group of properties, including resistance to creep, prolonged distortion, and oxidation. It is characterized as the longterm strength limit (the greatest mechanical stress endured by the material without failure at a given temperature, test duration, and working atmosphere), the creep limit (the stress that causes a given rate of deformation for some particular period of time at a given temperature), and sometimes the period of time before failure for a given stress, temperature, and working atmosphere.

References in periodicals archive ?
Among the key trends identified in this report are: improving the heat and chemical resistance of high perfomiance elastomers to allow their use in more demanding under-the-hood applications in automotive and engine construction; developing low cost high performance elastomers with better heat resistance performance to use in multiple applications in automotive construction; leveraging new market opportunities for elastomer components in autonomous vehicles and in the battery systems of the next generation electric vehicles; boosting silicone elastomers' heat resistance to over 300[degrees]C through the wider use of specialty polysiloxane additives; and potential new markets in cabling are waiting if high performance elastomers can be engineered with better water resistance.
A new polycarbonate that reportedly outperforms all other resins currently used in camera lenses in terms of refractive index and heat resistance has been developed by Teijin Kasei America, Norcross, Ga.
Using a common methodology to measure heat resistance of bacteria is crucial, so that the results of different studies can be compared.
Polymeric nanocomposites are being developed with high strength, high elastic modulus, heat resistance, and good electrical properties while retaining the flexibility, low specific gravity, and formability of the polymer matrix.
Researchers have patented a production process that comprises a preform formation step of forming a fiber preform made of silicon carbide short fibers having heat resistance of 1000[degrees]C or greater; a sol-gel preparation step of preparing a sol-gel solution containing a heat resistant compound having heat resistance of 1000[degrees]C or greater; an impregnation-drying-calcination step of impregnating the fiber preform with the sol-gel solution, followed by drying and calcining; and a crystallization step of crystallizing the fiber preform after impregnation, drying and calcination.
Bioplastics, for example, are being used increasingly in consumer electronics, automotive interiors and other areas, but conventional PLA has low heat resistance and limited injection-molding capability because of its longer molding cycle time.
The organism possesses no unusual heat resistance. However, environmental stresses can increase its resistance to heat.
Although PLA has been used for nose pads because its anti-bacterial properties help to avoid rashes, it has not been used for other parts because of its low heat resistance.
Because the alternating block types provide highly differentiated material properties along the chain, the traditional relationship of flexibility and heat resistance in the polymer is disrupted to a beneficial effect.
Current technologies used to impart heat resistance use metals or chemicals that are considered environmentally unfriendly.
The company formulates and manufactures its own adhesives, which feature: 250F heat resistance, water resistance, environmental safety and Low waste.