heat source


Also found in: Acronyms.

heat source

[′hēt ‚sȯrs]
(thermodynamics)
Any device or natural body that supplies heat.

heat source

1. The place or the environment from which heat is obtained.
2. The place from which a refrigeration system removes heat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Call for tendersconsultancy and support services for the concept development, development and testing of teaching materials for the work camp "solar heat source - we build a solar shower" within the project "wangeliner workcamps-a green idea of the future" 9:04:18
For the first heat source, and with semi-circular cylinders presence, the figure (5) show the local Nusselt number distribution along the heat source and the larger value of it at the leading edge because of the larger temperature drop at the leading edge of the heat source and then drop toward the flow stream.
Figure 3 shows a diagram of the heat source water supply network, which comprises water source heat pumps to provide cooling and heating in the office building (WAC), a water source heat pump for the supply of hot water in the research facility (WHW), ground heat exchangers (GHEX), two heat exchangers for exhaust heat recovery and boiler backup (HEX), and a cooling tower (CT).
Caption: Mount Adams (background) has an obvious heat source, but Mount St.
1), useful for heating systems with low potential heat source in the city of Odessa.
Although these new portable gas burners are a safer heat source alternative, keep in mind that whenever a heat source is required in the science lab, all possible safety precautions must be in place.
If they do go ahead, then they will have used our money, and will seek more of our money to develop this heat source.
2) The hot water unit of Ene-Farm and the backup heat source to heat up hot water for home heating and to supply hot water in case no hot water is left in the hot water tank were developed jointly by Tokyo Gas, Gaster Co.
In this newer way, the heat source being totally immersed, results in convection stirring, for better heat efficiency and distribution.
2010), which supposes that the cylindrical heat source is no longer a cavity but filled is with the medium identical to that out of the cylinder, as shown in Figures 2a and 2b.