Heat island effect

heat island effect

[′hēt ‚ī·lənd i‚fekt]
(meteorology)
In urban areas with tall buildings, an atmospheric condition in which heat and pollutants create a haze dome that prevents warm air from rising and being cooled at a normal rate, especially in the absence of strong winds.

Heat island effect

A phenomenon that occurs in developed areas where the replacement of natural land cover with paving, buildings, roads, and parking lots results in an increase in outdoor temperatures. The heat island effect can be mitigated by vegetation, green roofs, and light-colored materials that reflect heat. Urban heat islands can be as much as 10 degrees Fahrenheit hotter than the surrounding undeveloped areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
In its report, A Vision for a Greener, Healthier, Cooler Gowanus: Strategies to Mitigate Urban Heat Island Effect, the ULI notes that the extreme heat from UHI drives up energy costs and increases air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.
This significant rise is not fully caused by the urban heat island effect - up to five of the eight degrees are because of climate change.
The so-called urban heat island effect is responsible for the extra heat being felt by cities.
Green roofs have a number of sustainable advantages on an otherwise empty, unused space, including storm water runoff reduction, insulating qualities, urban heat island effect mitigation, improved air quality, and roof life extension.
This means the product could not only solve a huge waste problem but would also be useful in reducing the urban heat island effect common in cities.
Our cities and towns have now become recently hotter than their adjoining or nearby rural areas for various reasons and increasing green areas and planting more trees in the cities and towns is the most effective and cheapest way to cope with heat island effect that poses risk to lives and livelihoods in urban centres of the country,' Mushahidullah Khan noted.
He told the forest officials, 'Planting trees in urban centres must be made integral part of the seasonal monsoon and spring tree plantation campaigns and Prime Minister's Green Pakistan Programme (GPP) being implemented by the climate change ministry in collaboration with provincial forest departments to avert growing threat of heat island effect in urban areas that costs both lives and people's livelihoods.
Reflective pavement can go a long way toward reducing the urban heat island effect, but the embodied energy and emissions in some materials may present unexpected drawbacks, according to new research from the DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
In 2015, Alliance Data--which believes better data drives better decisions --joined with American Forests to lay the groundwork for a landmark study about the urban heat island effect and related air quality issues in Dallas, and the role of trees and greenspace to mitigate these climate issues.
The phenomenon known as the Urban Heat Island Effect occurs when heat is absorbed and released by buildings and paved surfaces, resulting in a warmer micro-climate.
The heat island effect can be counteracted slightly by using white or reflective materials to build houses, roofs, pavements and roads, thus increasing the overall albedo of the city.
Waste heat from buildings, sidewalks, parking lots, and roads is another factor that contributes to the heat island effect.