heat shock protein

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Related to Heat-shock protein: heat shock response, Hsp90

heat shock protein

[¦hēt ‚shäk ′prō‚tēn]
(cell and molecular biology)
Any of a group of proteins that are synthesized in the cytoplasm of cells as part of the heat shock response and act to protect the chromosomes from damage.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Interspecific- and acclimation-induced variation in levels of heat-shock proteins congeneric marine snails (genus Tegula): implications for regulation of hsp gene expression.
The induced increase in chilling tolerance could be through the induced synthesis and accumulation of stress-induced protective proteins (e.g., dehydrins, heat-shock proteins, and late-embryogenesis abundant proteins) (Collins et al., 1995; Egerton-Warburton et al., 1997; Sabehat et al., 1996; Wehmeyer and Vierling, 2000).
Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are important for protecting cells against high temperature and other stresses (Lindquist and Craig 1988; Parsell et al.
Vierling (1997)Expression and native structure of cytosolic class II small heat-shock proteins. Plant Physiol.
Gene expression of heat-shock proteins (Hsp23, Hsp70 and Hsp90) during and after larval diapause in the blow fly Lucilia sericata.
Heat-shock protein 104 expression is sufficient for thermotolerance in yeast.
Some evidence shows that inflammation and subsequent tissue damage in chronic PID are due to an immunopathologic reaction against a chlamydial heat-shock protein (hsp60) (14).
Because a signilicant number of genes were identified in the heat-shock protein functional category, we focused on HSP70 (the protein encoded by Hspa 1 b) for further validation.
Heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp 7b) as a biochemical stress indicator: an experimental field test in two congeneric intertidal gastropods (genus: Tegula).
This mild stress makes brain cells more active and triggers production of protective proteins, such as BDNF and heat-shock protein. Mattson suggests that the lightly stressed neurons tend to cope better with more-severe stress--such as that imposed by neurological disease--than cells of animals on a steady diet do.
Heat-shock protein (HSP70) response in the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, exposed to PAHs sorbed to suspended artificial clay particles and to suspended field contaminated sediments.