heat shock protein

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heat shock protein

[¦hēt ‚shäk ′prō‚tēn]
(cell and molecular biology)
Any of a group of proteins that are synthesized in the cytoplasm of cells as part of the heat shock response and act to protect the chromosomes from damage.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Interspecific- and acclimation-induced variation in levels of heat-shock proteins congeneric marine snails (genus Tegula): implications for regulation of hsp gene expression.
Heat-shock proteins as dendritic cell-targeting vaccines-getting warmer.
Heat-shock protein 65 as a beta cell antigen of insulin-dependent diabetes.
Molecular chaperones: towards a characterization of the heat-shock protein 70 family.
Five heat-shock proteins in the antigen processing and presentation KEGG pathway [Hspa 1 b, Hsp90aa 1, Hsp90ab 1, Hspa5, Hspa8U; (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes; Kanehisa Laboratories 2010)] were particularly notable (see Supplemental Material, Figure 1B).
Classes of drugs examined include SERMs and SERDs, aromatase inhibitors, microtubule binding agents, HER family inhibitors, angiogenesis inhibitors, miotic inhibitors, vaccines and immunomodulators, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, and inhibitors of heat-shock proteins 90 and 27.
The stress associated with a sublethal heat shock, which induces the rapid synthesis of heat-shock proteins, has received considerable attention primarily because of the importance of heat treatment to food safety.
The heat-shock response involves the induction of many proteins--called heat-shock proteins, or Hsp's--in response to elevation of temperature (Neidhardt and Vanbogelen, 1987).
The cancer-facilitating effects of Hsf1 may stem from its role as the ringleader of so-called heat-shock proteins. Stresses such as excessive heat, exposure to free radicals, or a lack of oxygen can damage a cell's molecular machinery.
The markers attempt to identify and isolate a variety of cell growth factors, like IGF, and the lack of proteins associated with cell death or protein degradation, like caspases that trigger death or heat-shock proteins (HSPs) that start the processes for protein breakdown.
While the literature on the appearance of protective proteins (e.g., late-embryogenesis abundant proteins and heat-shock proteins) during the development and maturation of seeds is extensive (Haslbeck, 2002; Ingram and Bartels, 1996), there is a paucity of information on the changes in these compounds during seedling germination and radicle elongation.