aircraft

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aircraft

any machine capable of flying by means of buoyancy or aerodynamic forces, such as a glider, helicopter, or aeroplane
www.aerospaceweb.org/aircraft/index.shtml
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

aircraft

[′er‚kraft]
(aerospace engineering)
Any structure, machine, or contrivance, especially a vehicle, designed to be supported by the air, either by the dynamic action of the air upon the surfaces of the structure or object or by its own buoyancy. Also known as air vehicle.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Aircraft

Any vehicle which carries one or more persons and which navigates through the air. The two main classifications of aircraft are lighter-than-air and heavier-than-air. The term lighter-than-air is applied to all aircraft which sustain their weight by displacing an equal weight of air, for example, blimps and dirigibles. Heavier-than-air craft are supported by giving the surrounding air a momentum in the downward direction equal to the weight of the aircraft. See Airplane, Helicopter

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Engineering. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

aircraft

Any structure, vehicle, or machine designed to travel through air supported by its own buoyancy or by the action of air on its surfaces. It includes airplanes, gliders, helicopters, and balloons. It does not include hovercraft, which obtain their lift from the reaction of air against the earth's surface. ICAO defines aircraft as “any machine that can derive support in the atmosphere from the reaction of the air other than the reaction of the air against the earth's surface.” Aircraft has also been defined as “device(s) that are used or intended to be used for flight in the air, and when used in air traffic control terminology, may include the flight crew” (“AIM,” FAA).
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps the most telling evidence of the public adoration for heavier-than-air flight came in the form of the national aviation fundraising campaign.
Powered, heavier-than-air flight had long been thought to be as impossible as the creation of a perpetual motion machine--but that would change as soon as word of their incredible success reached the world.
He was the only early flier who had significant successes in both lighter-than-air and heavier-than-air flight. He may have been the first to build a hangar for dirigibles.
Replica of Sir George Cayley's Glider 2 The 1773-1857 engineer, inventor, aviator from Scarborough made the first heavier-than-air flight in one of his flying machines at Brompton Vale near his home town.
and foreign governments, the court battles over patent infringements, the business ventures, and the decades-long refusal of the Smithsonian Institution to recognize the Wrights as the inventors of the first machine capable of manned, sustained, heavier-than-air flight.
The Barling's wingspan of 120 feet (the exact distance of the first sustained heavier-than-air flight and longer than the B-17's wingspan of 104 feet) made it unwieldy and underpowered, yet it needed only 320 yards to take off.
Thus, while Orville and Wilbur Wright were beginning their experiments that would lead to powered heavier-than-air flight in the lower atmosphere, Goddard had started thinking about vehicles for travel to the upper atmosphere and to outer space.
His success convinced Langley that the problem of heavier-than-air flight had been solved and suggested to others--including some in the War Department--that, if the problem was not so lved, the solution was at least within reach.
19) to the pursuit of controlled heavier-than-air flight. Crouch incorporates within an overarching chronological framework a review of the dogged efforts of such American aviation pioneers as Octave Chanute to make structural, power, and control theories into actual flying machines.
For the first time, a large model with a self-contained power plant had demonstrated heavier-than-air flight.