Hectograph


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Hectograph: mimeograph

Hectograph

 

a simplified printing apparatus for reproducing text and illustrations. The hectograph is a flat box filled with an even layer of a jellylike mass (a mixture of gelatin, glycerine, and water). The text and illustrations are put on paper by means of a special ink containing an aniline dye, glycerine, and alcohol. The resulting original copy is pressed against the surface of the gelatinous mass in the hectograph, resulting in the transfer of the print from the paper to the layer of gelatin. Subsequently, when blank paper is pressed against the surface of the gelatin, a copy of the text and illustrations is left on the paper. The hectograph makes it possible to obtain up to 100 copies. It was invented in Russia by M. I. Alisov in 1869. The hectograph is being replaced by more efficient devices, including mimeographs and rotaprinters.

References in periodicals archive ?
Teacher Blanche Morgan from Ochelata, Oklahoma reported that she hectographed a copy of the magazine's cover for each child to color and/or cut out.
During his lifetime, Steiner published only forty-one poems; Erich Fried circulated a hectographed selection, entitled Gestade, in 1947; and in 1950 the small Munich publishing house Willi Weismann prepared another selection, In Babylons Nischen, which because of financial difficulties never got beyond galley proofs.
The pages were hectographed. The purple ink came off on everything."