Freyja

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Freyja

(frā`yä) or

Freya

(frā`ä), Norse goddess of love, marriage, and fertility. Her identity and attributes were often confused with those of the goddess Frigg. As a deity of the dead, Freyja was entitled to half the warriors killed in battle, the other half going to Odin. She was the sister of the god Frey and was frequently represented as riding in a chariot drawn by cats.
References in periodicals archive ?
It should be noted, however, that Heith does use a popular vote measure in Chapter 7 of The Presidential Road Show, and finds that it possesses significantly less explanatory power.
In interviews conducted for this case study, public officials and lobbyists credited the HIAA spots with turning public opinion against the Clinton proposal (see West, Heith, and Goodwin 1996).
For example, Diane Heith argues that presidents use public opinion, even beyond simple approval or popularity, as a "strategic and purposeful tool, not simply as a barometer of the public environment" (Heith 2000, 381-82).
Specifically, public opinion has been identified as being useful for constructing policy-based rhetoric (Jacobs and Shapiro 2000), identifying political supporters and their issues (Heith 2000), as an introspective look at relative executive popularity (Towle 2004), and in navigating the "permanent campaign" from the White House (Ornstein and Mann 2000; Heith 2003).
Heith (2001) reports that 4,162 newspaper articles and 88 stories on the three network broadcasts mentioned Lieberman's candidacy during the 2000 campaign.
Jacobs and Shapiro, Politicians Don't Pander, 2000; Eisinger, The Evolution of Presidential Polling, 2003; Heith, Polling to Govern, 2004).
Scholars such as Larry Jacobs and Robert Shapiro and Robert Eisinger have carefully documented the development of what Heith calls the "polling infrastructure" within the White House.
Subsequent work has significantly expanded our understanding of the origins, scope, and implications of private presidential polling (Eisinger 2003; Towle 2004; Heith 1998, 2000; Jacobs and Shapiro 1995; Jacobs and Jackson 2004; Druckman et al.
Diane Heith, Carole Kennedy, Ann Gordon, and Jerry Miller all find significant gender stereotyping when analyzing the media in presidential campaigns.
Scholars have recently explored the origins of the institutionalization of public opinion polling in the administrative apparatus of the White House (see Jacobs and Shapiro 1995; Heith 1998; Eisinger and Brown 1998; Eisinger 2000).
In the Nixon administration," according to Diane Heith (1998), "public opinion data was both tightly controlled and publicly displayed" (p.