Hecuba

(redirected from Hekabe)
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Hecuba

(hĕk`yo͝obə), in Greek mythology, chief wife of Priam, king of Troy. Hecuba bore to Priam 19 children, including Paris, Hector, Troilus, Cassandra, and others who were prominent in the Trojan War. To save Polydorus, her youngest son, from the Greeks, Hecuba sent him to Polymnestor, king of Thrace. After the sack of Troy she was allotted to Odysseus, who on his way home stopped at Thrace. Learning there that Polymnestor had murdered Polydorus, Hecuba, in revenge, blinded the king and killed his children. She is an important character in Euripides' plays Hecuba and The Trojan Women.

Hecuba

mourns the death of her children. [Gk. Drama: Benét, 450]
See: Grief

Hecuba

kills Polymestor’s children and blinds him for his treacherous murder of her son Polydorus. [Gk. Drama: Euripides Hecuba in Benét, 450]
References in periodicals archive ?
Often, the unthinkability of an action is signalled by the reaction of characters within the story, as Hekabe does not believe Priam could go to the Greek camp, or as Achilles doubts his own ability to control his anger.
"Euripides' Hekabe and the Somatics of Dionysiac Drama." Ramus 20: 53-94.
HEKABE. There's a strange power, bad power, in numbers combined with cunning.
2) Recognizable hero or heroine: A hero/heroine is generally recognizable as the character who is onstage most (that would be Hekabe) and the character who elicits our pity and fear (that might be Hekabe or it might not; you will find her difficult to empathize with in the end).
Her well-being, or lack thereof, is never an issue for him, as becomes clear when Hekabe suggests that the Trojans forget about her because she seems happy and well taken care of in Sparta as Telamon's wife and queen.
Hecuba (Greek Hekabe) In Greek legend, the principal wife of the Trojan king Priam, mother of Hector.
(72) Compare the behavior of the chorus of the Seven of Aeschylus, or the description in Hekabe 935-36.
sung by his wife Andromache (24.725-45), his mother Hekabe (24.748-59),
In the list of performable scenes given by Socrates in the Ion, the possible length appears to vary from as little as seven lines (Iliad 22.430-36 concerning Hekabe) to several hundred (Iliad 24.144-717 on Priam), if in fact these are the scenes assumed by Socrates' mention of the scenes "about" (peri + acc.) Hekabe and Priam, respectively (Plato, Ion 535b).
Hecuba (Greek Hekabe) Drama by Euripides, performed about 425 BC.
Then Hekabe, Hektor's mother, makes an appeal, but this also leaves Hektor unmoved.