Heliacal


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Related to Heliacal: Heliacal setting

Heliacal

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Heliacal means associated with the Sun (from the Greek helios, meaning “sun”). The heliacal rising of a star is its first appearance following a period of invisibility due to its conjunction with the Sun. Similarly, the heliacal setting of a star refers to its last appearance before entering into a conjunction with the Sun.

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References in periodicals archive ?
And yet, the heliacal rising of Sirius that occurred on or about a certain specific date every year would actually move forward one day every four years with the clerical 365-day calendar of the Egyptians, so that by the time of the post-Alexandrian pharaohs it was deemed so badly in need of reform that, once and for all, the ecclesiastic year was decreed that it should conform with the civil year.
The Atharvaveda (AVg 13,1,22) calls Rohini the devoted wife of Rohita, the rising sun, which suggests heliacal observation.
11 DAWN: On this or the next few mornings, look low in the east-southeast about 20 minutes before sunrise for the heliacal rising (first dawn visibility) of Sirius as it emerges from the Sun's glare.
Three days earlier, on August 15th, I had observed something just as interesting: the brightest of all stars at its famed "heliacal rising." Of course, I'm talking about Sirius, which in February is at its highest and most convenient for viewing in the evening hours.
159) from Uruk establishes "correspondences between the liver examined by the haruspex and the heliacal risings of constellations." [42] Reiner also points out the dependence of magical practices on astrology, as reflected by texts such as BRMIV nos.
Egyptians therefore held their New Year celebration at the time of this heliacal rising of Sirius.
86637, and (8), a similar table from Tanis, are discussed in the general survey;] (9) Papyrus Carlsberg 9; (10) Sothic dates, i.e., Egyptian dates of the heliacal rising of Sirius (Greek Sothis); (11) the decanal clock on Meshet's coffin; (12) the Book of Nut; (13) the dramatic text in Seti I's cenotaph; (14) the Ramesside star clock; (15) Amenemhet's water clock; (16) the shadow clock in Seti I's cenotaph; (17) the zodiacs in the temples at Esna and Dendera; and (18) the statue of the astronomer Harkhebi.
Julius Caesar held that the heliacal rising of the Pleiades (meaning the first date each year when they could be seen in the east before sunrise) marked the beginning of summer.
Since Sirius "begins its heliacal rise to reach its akme" in the month of Tir (June 21-July 21), "one of the most torrid months of the year in Iran" (p.
(In traditional Maori society, a watchful eye is kept on the evening sky following the heliacal rising of Matariki to spot the appearance of the next new Moon.
Luft's analysis shows that this festival was dated by the lunar calendar and occurred before the heliacal rising of Sothis.