Heliodorus


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Heliodorus

(hē'lēōdôr`əs), fl. 175 B.C., Syrian statesman. The treasurer of Seleucus IV (Seleucus Philopator), he murdered the king and attempted unsuccessfully to usurp the throne. According to the Book of Second Maccabees, he entered the Temple at Jerusalem but was prevented from taking the treasure by three angels.

Heliodorus

 

Dates of birth and death unknown. Greek writer of the third century, author of the novel Aethiopica, the story of the love and adventures of the Aethiopian princess Chariclea and the Thessalian youth Theagenes. In Europe the novel has been known since 1534, when it was first published. It served as a model for novels of gallantry and adventure of the 17th and 18th centuries.

WORKS

Les Ethiopiques (Théagène et Chariclée), vols. 1-3. Paris, 1935-43. In Russian translation, Efiopika. Introduction and commentary by A. Egunov. Moscow, 1965.

REFERENCES

Istoriia grecheskoi literatury, vol. 3. Edited by S. I. Sobolevskii [and others]. Moscow, 1960. Pages 268-71.
Oeftering, M. Heliodor und seine Bedeutung für die Literatur, Berlin, 1901.

L. A. FREIBERG

Heliodorus

Syrian official attempted to loot Solomon’s temple. [Apocrypha: II Maccabees 3]
References in periodicals archive ?
Grammatically, this reading is undoubtedly correct: both classical authors and Heliodorus use [phrase omitted] in present tense to refer to knowledge which the subject already possesses.
COMPARATIVE ANALYSES OF HELIODORUS and Miguel de Cervantes ate often framed in terms of how the Greek author s adventure novel, the Ethiopica, influenced Cervantes's creative process in writing Persiles y Sigismunda, his final and posthumously published novel.
18) Similar architectural features can be found in Raphael's frescoes in the rooms (stanze) of the papal apartment in the Vatican Palace, especially in the Expulsion of Heliodorus from the Temple and the Coronation of Charlemagne.
The long section in the middle--Part 2 ("The Development of the Greek Tradition")--discusses Greek texts and genres that, with the exception of Heliodorus, were written between the beginning and the end of Greek literature.
695) that `it is in the story itself, and the manner in which Heliodorus unfolds its complexities, that his superiority (sc.
31) We know now, of course, that of the five extant romances, two (Chariton and Xenophon of Ephesus) predate the other far more rhetorically inflected three exemplars (Longus, and Achilles Tatius, II CE; Heliodorus, mid III-mid IV CE), so that while the initial emphasis on the Second Sophistic as the single context for the genre may be misplaced, it is utterly significant for the underlying ideology of Rohde's approach.
Bartsch, Decoding the Ancient Novel: The reader and the role of description in Heliodorus and Achilles Tatius (Princeton, 1989) E.
Whereas Heliodorus uses magic to make a philosophical and religious
Dudley reads the slippage between Guinea and Ethiopia as a deliberate gesture which "reinforces the literary link to Heliodorus and endows Dorotea/Micomicona with the aura of a Byzantine heroine" (256-257).
5), a woman, seen from behind, assumes a pose strikingly similar to that of the female figure in the Transfiguration: with her left knee forward and right knee back, she twists her right shoulder forward and left back and looks across her shoulder to observe the punishment of Heliodorus by the celestial messengers for attempting to steal, on behalf of one of the Selucid monarchs, the treasure of the temple in Jerusalem.
31) In Winkler's account, Heliodorus is chiefly concerned with the way in which "the interplay" of romantic melodrama and providential explanation allows him to display an ironic self-consciousness about literary convention and genre.
It engages such issues as chronology and origins; sex, gender, and erotics; the influence of other cultures (Egypt and the Near East), along with concepts of Hellenismos and paideia, to focus finally on the case of Heliodorus before considering the future of prose fiction as situated between canonicity and marginality.