Heliogravure


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Heliogravure

 

one of the methods of gravure in which the printing form is made by using photographic and chemical processes. Heliogravure first appeared in the second half of the 19th century.

The diapositive of the image is copied on paper that has a light-sensitive layer of gelatin (pigment paper). The copy is transferred to a copper plate covered with grains of asphalt, which form a screen. As a result of the development of the copy there appears on the plate a gelatinous relief of various thicknesses, depending on the degree of saturation of the colors of the image. Treatment with a ferric chloride solution results in the formation of deepened printing elements on the plate. The heliogravure method is distinguished by the high quality of reproduction. However, its productivity is low, and it has been replaced by gravure using a doctor blade.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The illustrations are reproductions of heliogravures of original gouaches, and one signed engraving.
Since its appearance as an art form in itself in the early 1900s, photography has developed in leaps and strides, rivaling traditional modes of portraiture in ever-innovative forms, from heliogravures to digital prints and even mobile phone shots -- and the works here are evidence of just how varied and ever-innovative this art form is.
For example, Esser depicts a provincial gothic church, as in Rumilly-les-Vaudes, 2007, from the ongoing "Combray" series, begun in 2007, or the water in a canal amid the trees, as in Pontorson, 2007, from the same series; both are heliogravures on handmade paper printed with no blacks, only an infinite range of grays.