Hell-fire Club

Hell-fire Club

18th-century British clique devoted to debauchery. [Br. Hist.: Brewer Note-Book, 411]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to discussing the implications of names in Persuasion, Barchas explores issues ranging from Austen's "promiscuity" in her borrowings across the political spectrum to ironies of geography in Northanger Abbey to the Hell-Fire Club resonance of the name "Dashwood.
All these foundations laid the groundwork for Francis Dashwood's Hell-Fire Club at Medmanham (in fact, the golden globe on Dashwood's house used to be visible some years ago from the High Wycombe Road, but perhaps no longer today).
Geoffrey Ashe's account of the Hell-Fire clubs is probably the nearest we come to the British equivalent of the excesses of the Marquis de Sade (and we have to remember that the inheritance of all this curiously dangerous playing with occult fire was passed on to Lord Byron - mad, bad and dangerous to know).
The Hell-Fire Club is dispatched in three non-informative sentences.
It denounced <IR> COTTON MATHER </IR> for advocating vaccination against smallpox--Mather called the contributors to the Courant the <IR> HELL-FIRE CLUB </IR> .