Hellenes

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Hellenes

 

the self-designation of the Greeks. As a term designating all Greeks, it is first encountered in the works of the poet Archilochus (seventh century B.C.).

References in periodicals archive ?
DeLaura entitled his book Hebrew and Hellene in Victorian England (1969).
It is natural for Hellenes to rule barbarians, and not, mother, for barbarians to rule Hellenes.
The great struggle against Persia did in fact bring home to the Hellenes all that they held in common--the blood and the tongue that they shared, the shrines of the gods and the public sacrifices, and their similarity in manners and ways.
Rutland, Swinburne: A Nineteenth Century Hellene (Oxford: Blackwell.
Starwood joins a growing stable of renewable energy and green tech industries including Brookfield Power's 189-megawatt wind farm and 203 megawatts worth of hydroelectric generation, a 70-megawatt co-generation plant at Essar Steel Algoma, Hellene Canada's new solar panel manufacturing plant and Ellsin Environmental's tire recycling facility.
It's excruciatingly hot today and I have spent hours waiting for my car," said car-park patron Hellene Khouri.
This, after all, was the city of Alexander the Great of whom Cavafy wrote: "He was the best of things - a Hellene - mankind has no quality more precious.
Walker - Hellene Walker, 74, of the Lane County area, died Oct.
Grand-dam Gay Hellene won up to 1m4f, and she was out of Gaily, winner of the Irish 1,000 Guineas and placed in both the Irish Oaks and the Prix Vermeille.
Hellene et Chretien (Paris, 1951) en que hablaba de dos etapas diferenciadas en la vida del autor, que es, muy a grandes rasgos, el modelo que proponen Bregman, Lemerle o Wilamowitz.
True, a certain tribe of Hellenes from the region of Hellas, "the land of beautiful women" (kalligunaika), is mentioned by Homer to be under the rule of Achilles, thus presaging the notion of the Hellene as an eminent lover of female beauty.
Despite the Hellene Libanius's picture of happy unanimity during Kalends, it was the threat to or lack of unanimity that inspired Asterius's denunciation of the festival.