Helodermatidae


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Related to Helodermatidae: Heloderma horridum, venomous lizard

Helodermatidae

[‚hē·lō·dər′mad·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A family of lizards in the suborder Sauria.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Helodermatidae

 

a family of poisonous lizards. The trunk is spindle-shaped and compact, and the tail is short and thick. The length is up to 80 cm. The upper part of the body is covered with large tubercular scales. The coloring is mottled, with dark markings on an orange-red or whitish yellow background. The teeth are long and grooved. The submaxillary glands produce a poison that is lethal to small vertebrates; cases of death in humans are known.

The family’s two species, the gila monster (Helodermasuspectum) and the beaded lizard (H. horridum), are distributed from the southwestern USA to southwestern Mexico. They in habit arid, rocky foothills and semideserts. The lizards are crepuscular and nocturnal. They feed on insects, lizards, snakes, rodents, young birds, and birds’ and reptiles’ eggs. The female lays three to 12 eggs.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
-- This represents the first report of a coccidian from any member of the family Helodermatidae. Oocysts of this new species are morphologically distinguishable from other eimerians described from lizards, and only a handful of species appear similar.
Redescription of the microfilaria, Piratuba mitchelli (Smith) (Onchocercidae) from the Gila monster, Heloderma suspectum Cope (Helodermatidae).
Many modern families and genera of anurans make their first appearance in North America during the Miocene, including Bufo, Rana, Pelobatidae, and Hylidae, Many families of lizards occur, including Iguanidae (sensu lato), Scincidae, Teiidae, Anguidne, Helodermatidae, Xantusiidae, and Rhineuridae.