thyroidectomy

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thyroidectomy

[‚thī·rȯi′dek·tə·mē]
(medicine)
Surgical removal of the thyroid gland.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A randomized trial of hemithyroidectomy versus Dunhill for the surgical management of asymmetrical multinodular goiter.
Base-case limitations of the both studies included that all Afirma GEC suspicious cases were directed to diagnostic hemithyroidectomy, and when malignant all cases then underwent completion thyroidectomy and added this significant cost.
Criteria for inclusion were availability of records of patients who underwent thyroidectomy or hemithyroidectomy between July 2006 and June 2010, had nodules larger than 1.5 cm along at least one axis (longitudinal, anterior-posterior, transverse), and had FNAC and histopathology reports approved by a qualified consultant cytopathologist.
Patients and Methods: The frequency of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury following surgery for benign, nontoxic thyroid disease was studied in consecutive patients undergoing hemithyroidectomy, subtotal thyroidectomy or near total thyroidectomy.
Only 440 patients (1.2%) did not undergo hemithyroidectomy or total thyroidectomy, with or without irradiation, within 1 year of diagnosis.
"When treatment is elected, the cancers in this category can be managed with either hemithyroidectomy [removal of part of the thyroid] or total thyroidectomy [removal of the complete gland], and the prognosis will be the same," they added.
Multinodular goiter presenting as a clinical single nodule: how effective is hemithyroidectomy? Aust N Z J Surg 69: 34-36.
The pituitary thyroid axis after hemithyroidectomy in euthyroid man.
The traveler had a previous hemithyroidectomy for a nontoxic nodule, had evidence of autoimmune disease, and tested positive for antithyroid peroxidase antibodies.
When the participants were asked about their treatment suggestions for classical papillary carcinoma that was restricted with a single lobe and detected by fine needle biopsy, and had a diameter of <1cm, the views of 65% were in favor of total thyroidectomy, 33% in favor of hemithyroidectomy, 0.5% in favor of follow-up, and 0.5% in favor of ablation treatment [laser, radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA), high intensity focused ultrasonography (HI-FU)].
However, the treatment of the patients in whom the fish bone stuck in the thyroid gland usually is hemithyroidectomy, because of inflammation and abscess surrounding the fish bone.
Patients with malignant cytopathology underwent near-total or total thyroidectomy in most cases except those with microcarcinomas in whom unilateral hemithyroidectomy is usually performed.