hemolytic uremic syndrome

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hemolytic uremic syndrome

[hē·mə¦lid·ik yə¦rēm·ik ′sin‚drōm]
(medicine)
An illness characterized by the abrupt onset of decreased urine production, loss of kidney function, and anemia. It may be accompanied by edema, hypertension, blood-clotting disorders, and seizures. It is often caused by infection with Escherichia coli O157:H7 but has also been associated with Salmonella and Shigella.
References in periodicals archive ?
Escherichia coli O 157:H7-associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome after ingestion of contaminated hamburgers.
People with atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome experience kidney damage and acute kidney failure that lead to end-stage renal disease in about half of all cases.
Terminal complement inhibitor eculizumab in atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome. N Engl J Med 2013; 368: 2169-81.
Saez et al., "Eculizumab for atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome," The New England Journal of Medicine, vol.
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome. Pediatr Rev 2006;27: 398-9.
coli hemolytic-uremic syndrome), the points been proved in several studies.
Escherichia coli O157:H7 and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome. New England Journal of Medicine, 333, 364-368.
Detection of the proteolytic enzyme ADAMTS-13 may be used to differentiate between the forms of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS).
The term "hemolytic-uremic syndrome" was coined by Gasser, et al., in 1955 to describe a devastating illness consisting of nonimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure.
A total of 19 patients were hospitalized and 9 developed hemolytic-uremic syndrome in the outbreaks, which led the CDC to draft guidelines for handwashing, safer food service, and other infection-control measures at such establishments.
Community-wide outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome associated with non-0157 verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coil.
Probably not, but you must not wince at each "whilst." And you must tolerate colloquialisms such as "pen torch" for "pen light" and "napkin rash" for "diaper rash." And you must remember that the British spelling is sometimes different from ours; for example, placing an "a" before an "e." This may not seem too onerous, but when I searched the index for "hemolytic-uremic syndrome," it was not there.