Henderson the Rain King


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Henderson the Rain King

character’s frustration shown by his continually saying, “I want, I want.” [Am. Lit.: Henderson the Rain King]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Muhlestein discusses erroneous convictions concerning Bellow's stereotypes of blacks by studying Henderson the Rain King. In Muhlestein's opinion, while the novel seems to highlight ideologies revitalizing colonialism and perpetuating white supremacy, in fact it undermines such perceptions in major ways.
He was reading William Blake, his favorite English poet, and I was reading Bellow's most recent book, Henderson the Rain King. In a most unusual author-reader encounter, whenever I had a question about the book, I leaned out over my berth and asked, "Saul, what did you mean by this?" All I got in response was a knowing smile.
Saul Bellow's HENDERSON THE RAIN KING (142339349X, $29.99) receives Joe Barrett's fine voice as it provides a 50th anniversary audio edition of Saul Bellow's classic story of one man's spiritual quest to Africa.
Chodat focuses on Henderson the Rain King (1959), especially the novel's central dialogue between Henderson and King Dahfu, the Wariri philosopher prince whom Henderson meets while exploring Africa.
The disrepute into which Saul Bellow's Henderson the Rain King has fallen in some circles tracks a growing cultural prejudice against novels that depart from autobiographical or journalistic models.
Henderson the Rain King by Saul Bellow (Penguin, 7.19 [pounds sterling]) The misguided hero tries to find a home in Africa and causes destruction along the way.
A Not having written `The Great Geordie novel', which I wanted to do since I read Saul Bellow's Henderson The Rain King when I was a teen.
He treats in separate chapters not only Dangling Man but also The Adventures of Augie March (1954), Henderson the Rain King (1958), Herzog (1964), and Humboldt's Gift (1975).
In terms of personality and spiritual texture, Quinn bears a remarkable resemblance to another great spiritual pilgrim: Eugene Henderson in Saul Bellow's 1959 novel, Henderson the Rain King. Early in their stories, both men detect an emptiness in their lives.
But surely the reason someone would serve as a selector, besides vanity, is the hope of shaping the process of cultural transmission: Henderson the Rain King (21), not The Assistant or Pictures from an Institution or Their Eyes Were Watching God.
This "Africanist discourse," Greusser demonstrates, informs the works of first-generation post-war writers (from 1945 to the early 1960s) like Evelyn Waugh (A Tourist in Africa), Graham Greene (The Heart of the Matter), and Saul Bellow (Henderson the Rain King), who, apart from ignoring the political changes in Africa, consciously chose to exploit the Africanist discourse for their literary ends.

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