Henslowe


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Henslowe

Philip. died 1616, English theatre manager, noted also for his diary
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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The stage pictures of Henslowe hounded by his creditiors and Will struggling with writer's block as he scribbles out the next sonnet, capture the atmosphere of a 17th century theatre very well, helped by good costumes.
(8) There is one touch that may feel familiar to a student of Daborne's letters to Henslowe. Daborne identifies four duties of those in authority.
By focusing exclusively on Henslowe's Diary and the
(6) But its prologue, which was written for court, couples its fawning praise of Elizabeth with two disclaimers of the play: "being indeed no way offensive" and that "nothing is purposed but mirth." (7) Preempting potential offence twice in twenty lines is suggestive that the text could offend someone at court, wherein the patrons of both London companies (including Henslowe and Alleyn) and Edmund Tilney, Master of the Revels, would presumably have been in attendance.
Henslowe, who staged at least one of Shakespeare's plays, 'Titus Andronicus', recorded 30 occasions when he dined with a Gilbert East who was also Henslowe's bailiff for properties that he owned.
Finally, there is no doubt that material relating to the early modern theatre is rare, but the exclusion of Philip Henslowe's diary --one of the most valuable sources of information for the theatrical history of the period--does seem an odd omission.
Henslowe Fisk takes his cantankerous father Horatio to a lecture on the transmigration of souls by an Indian swami.
"A Tangle in Slops" tells the story of Ada Henslowe as she returns to her small hometown to help her cousin orphan Mary.
Neil Carson concentrates on the 1602-03 period in Henslowe's records and concludes: "Dramatists appear to have formed loose partnerships or syndicates which worked together for short periods and then broke up and reformed into other alliances," so that "the impression one is left with is of the playwright as a relatively independent agent who seems to have had considerable control over his own methods of work and to have used that freedom to market his skills, alone or in association with others, to his greatest advantage" (22-3).
Attending a lecture on the transmigration of souls, Henslowe Fisk (Jeremy Northam) and his cantankerous father Horatio (Peter O'Toole) meet Dean Spanley (Sam Neill), who later reveals a connection to Horatio's beloved dog Wag.
It would have been very odd if dramatists writing for the Admiral's men, in particular, had not tried to imitate Marlowe: not only had they performed Tamburlaine "sundrie times" by 1590, as the title page of the quarto indicates, but Philip Henslowe's Diary shows that Marlowe's plays were central to the repertory of the reconstituted version of the company that moved to the Rose in 1594.
Henslowe Fisk (Jeremy Northam) takes his cantankerous father Horatio (Peter OToole) to a lecture on the transmigration of souls.