Heraclius


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to Heraclius: Leo III, Constans II

Heraclius

(hĕrəklī`əs, hĭrăk`lēəs), c.575–641, Byzantine emperor (610–41). The son of a governor of Africa, he succeeded the tyrant Phocas, whom he deposed and had executed. In the early years of his reign Avars and Bulgars threatened, attacking even Constantinople, and the Persians conquered Syria, Palestine, and Egypt. In three costly campaigns (622–28) Heraclius recovered the provinces from the Persians, but they fell (629–42) to the Muslim Arabs. He sought to reconcile the Monophysites with the Orthodox Church; this attempt led to the compromise of MonotheletismMonotheletism
or Monothelitism
[Gr.,=one will], 7th-century opinion condemned as heretical by the Third Council of Constantinople in 680 (see Constantinople, Third Council of).
..... Click the link for more information.
, which was rejected by both sides. Heraclius began the reorganization of the empire into military provinces (themes). He was succeeded briefly by his son Constantine III and then by his grandson Constans IIConstans II
(Constans Pogonatus), 630–68, Byzantine emperor (641–68), son and successor of Constantine III and grandson of Heraclius. Early in his reign Armenia and Asia Minor were invaded by the Muslims, who challenged Byzantine supremacy at sea, took Cyprus, and
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Heraclius

 

Born 575 in Cappadocia; died Feb. 11, 641, in Constantinople. Byzantine emperor from 610.

Heraclius seized power during a period of profound internal and external political crisis in the Byzantine Empire. He temporarily succeeded in strengthening the empire’s position: in 626 an invasion of Constantinople by the Avars and Slavs was repulsed; in 627–28 the Persians were defeated, and the lands they had conquered in Asia and Egypt were returned. In the succeeding years of Heraclius’ rule, however, these eastern provinces were conquered by the Arabs. Many Byzantine scholars connect major military and administrative reforms with Heraclius’ name, including the creation of the theme system.

Heraclius

?575--641 ad, Byzantine emperor, who restored the Holy Cross to Jerusalem (629)
References in periodicals archive ?
In the name of Allah the Beneficent, the Merciful (This letter is) from Muhammad the slave of Allah and His Apostle to Heraclius the ruler of Byzantine.
After narrating the discriminations carried on by Heraclius against his 'coreligionists', Michael the Elder remarks:
11, lower right) has a good analogy found in burial chamber 5 in Samos together with three coins struck for Emperor Heraclius in 611/2, 612/3, and 613/4 (Martini & Steckner 1993, 127 f.
Sixteen years later, the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius recaptured Jerusalem and what was believed to be the True Cross and restored it to a newly rebuilt church.
Only in the early 7th century, when Heraclius renamed Hyssi Portus Herakleia, did Hyssi Portus surpass Trapezus' significance as a port and military base.
After a long siege, and having received no support from Emperor Heraclius, in the winter of 637-638, he decided to surrender the city to the Arabs.
Carile, "Giovanni di Nikius," 123-33, reviews John's perspective on the Roman emperors up to Heraclius.
The Byzantine Emperor Heraclius ordered the conversion of all the Jews in the 7th century but it just didn't take hold.
Though it lies beyond the scope of his book, this 7th-century example reinforces Goldsworthy's overall interpretation, as it was Phokas's coup that provided the pretext for Sasanian intervention and it was the civil war between Phokas and Heraclius that helped pave the way for the extraordinary, decades-long Sasanian occupation of most of the eastern provinces.
ByzantineKhazar relations date from the seventh century, when the Khazars supported a military campaign undertaken by Emperor Heraclius against the Persians settled in the territories of the Caucasus and Armenia.
The coins bear the image of the Byzantine emperor Heraclius, who ruled between 610 and 641 A.
While the remains of the once-powerful Persian empire fell into chaos, Heraclius returned to Constantinople in victory, entering the city in a chariot drawn by four elephants.