Adams, Herbert Baxter

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Adams, Herbert Baxter,

1850–1901, American historian, b. Shutesbury, near Amherst, Mass. In 1876, the year he received his doctorate at Heidelberg, he became one of the original faculty of Johns Hopkins Univ. There, in 1880, he began his famous seminar in history, where a large proportion of the next generation of American historians trained. Adams founded the "Johns Hopkins Studies in Historical and Political Science," the first of such series, and brought about the organization in 1884 of the American Historical Association. His historical writings introduced scientific methods of investigation that influenced many historians, including Frederick Jackson Turner. He authored Life and Writings of Jared Sparks (1893) and many articles and influential reports on the study of the social sciences.

Adams, Herbert Baxter

(1850–1901) historian, educator; born in Shutesbury, Mass. Educated at Amherst College and Heidelberg, Germany, he joined the faculty of Johns Hopkins University at its inception (1876) and played a major role in the professionalization of American history. His Johns Hopkins Studies in Historical and Political Science series (1877) set standards throughout the country. He was one of the founders of the American Historial Society (1884) and was its secretary until 1900.
References in periodicals archive ?
Herbert Baxter Adams is one of many American historians whose historical work has cither been passed over as discredited or mentioned only briefly.
La Universidad Johns Hopkins, en Estados Unidos, se origina en 1876 y para 1880 uno de sus profesores, Herbert Baxter Adams, acuna formalmente el termino de Ciencia Politica.
1) At Johns Hopkins University, from 1884 to 1896, Herbert Baxter Adams, James Bryce, Richard Ely, Albert Shaw, and Woodrow Wilson, offered a curriculum aimed at building a justification for--and confidence in--American public administration.
Herbert Baxter Adams and the Spirit of Local Government
In 1887, Herbert Baxter Adams, professor of American and institutional history, head of the Department of History and Political Science, and secretary of the new American Historical Society, could claim that his university was the leading training school for administrators and public officials in the United States.
The American Historical Association presented its prestigious Herbert Baxter Adams Prize for 2001 to Daniel Lord Small of Fordham University for his case study of medieval Marseilles.