Herculaneum


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Herculaneum

(hərkyəlā`nēəm), ancient city of S Italy, on the gulf of Naples at the foot of Mt. Vesuvius. Damaged by an earthquake in A.D. 63, it was completely buried, along with PompeiiPompeii
, ancient city of S Italy, a port near Naples and at the foot of Mt. Vesuvius. Possibly an old Oscan settlement, it was a Samnite city for centuries before it passed under Roman rule at the time of Lucius Cornelius Sulla (1st cent. B.C.).
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, by the volcanic eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in A.D. 79. Before the earthquake, it was a popular Roman resort and residential town with fine villas. The first discovery of ruins was made in 1709, and excavations have continued since. Important early finds were the sumptuous so-called Villa of the Papyri (with a large library, and bronze and marble statues), a basilica with fine murals, and a theater. The modern towns of Resina and Portici are on the site.

Bibliography

See J. J. Deiss, Herculaneum (1966, repr. 1968).

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Herculaneum

an ancient city in SW Italy, of marked Greek character, on the S slope of Vesuvius: buried along with Pompeii by an eruption of the volcano (79 ad). Excavation has uncovered well preserved streets, houses, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Pompeii and its neighboring towns of Herculaneum and Stabiae became abandoned for centuries.
Pompeii was buried under 10 feet of ash, while Herculaneum, which was hit by the first wave of ashes, was buried under 75 inches of ash.
But the smaller Herculaneum is, if anything, more chilling.
The chapters are unfurled in a logical sequence and cover such topics as urban case studies of the best preserved public latrines in Pompeii, Herculaneum, Rome, and Ostia; hygiene and sanitation through the lens of cross-cultural anthropology and archaeological theory, with brief overviews of biblical, European, Muslim, Hindu, Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese examples; sanitation in Rome, with the star appearance of the Cloaca Maxima; what Roman toilets reveal about a less-than-desirable level of Roman public health; the Roman concepts of public and private; the moral superiority of elites who used wealth to ensure their privacy; and finally the valuable evidence supplied by relevant Roman wall paintings and written sources.
Students were also exposed to the effects of the AD79 eruption and the devastation this caused to Pompeii and Herculaneum for example, the site of Herculaneum being buried 16 metres in pyroclastic flow or the bodies of victims encased in ash at Pompeii.
'A catastrophe which destroyed the loveliest regions of the earth, a fate shared by whole cities and their people, and one so memorable' --so begins the first of the two celebrated letters written by Pliny the Younger to the historian Tacitus in the 1st century AD, recording the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD and the obliteration of Pompeii and Herculaneum. Pliny's text and his recollection of the event, which he witnessed, and in which his uncle Pliny the Elder died, were well known in the following centuries, but it was only in 1738, with the discovery of Herculaneum and 10 years later with the start of excavations at Pompeii, that the two ill-fated cities truly started to capture the imagination of the Western world.
the Marty 10 Basilisk; 9 Orion; 8 Fletcher; Jessica 7 Janeiro; de Rio 6 ;Nehru Jawaharial 5 Desdemona; 4 Twenty; 3 Herculaneum; 2 Pig; Black The 1 ANSWERS:
During their visit, they went to Pompeii and Herculaneum to see the destruction caused by the 79AD eruption of Mount Vesuvius and the preserved buildings and casts of bodies.
When Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 A.D., burying several Roman towns, including Pompeii and Herculaneum, there was no such thing as hitting "save'' on your papyrus scroll, and no time to worry about anything but life and death.
79 AD: Vesuvius erupted, destroying the cities nof Pompeii and Herculaneum and killing 2,000 people.