Herm

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Herm:

see Channel IslandsChannel Islands,
archipelago (2015 est. pop. 164,000), 75 sq mi (194 sq km), 10 mi (16 km) off the coast of Normandy, France, in the English Channel. The main islands are Jersey, Guernsey, Alderney, and Sark, and there are several smaller islands, including Herm, Jethou, and
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, British dependency.

herm

(hûrm), in 6th-century Greek art, vertical pillar surmounted by a bearded human head and often having a phallus below. These structures were considered sacred to Hermes. They were placed on street corners in Athens and used outside the city as milestones. By the end of the Hellenistic era the form was employed for portraiture.
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Herm

A rectangular post, usually of stone, tapering downward, surmounted by a bust of Hermes or other divinity or by a human head.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Herm

 

a tetrahedral pillar originally topped by the sculptured head of the god Hermes (hence the name) and later of other gods; from the fifth century B.C. with portraits of statesmen, philosophers, and other important men. Herms served as landmarks and road signs. In the 16th century they became a popular type of decorative and park sculpture.

REFERENCE

Lullies, R. Die Typen der griechischen Herme. Königsberg, 1931.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

herm

herm
A rectangular post, usually of stone and tapering downward, surmounted by a bust of Hermes or other divinity, or by a human head.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.