Hermine


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Hermine

her body is shrunk to figurine size. [Ger. Lit.: Herman Hesse Steppenwolf]
References in periodicals archive ?
In January, FDEM also implemented new procedures to accelerate FEMA reimbursements to communities impacted by hurricanes Irma, Matthew and Hermine. Previously, the Division required projects to be 100-percent validated before any funding was awarded.
The firm said that it has already started to pay out around USD70,000 for about 120 claims from Hurricane Hermine.
On Sunday, Hermine was technically a post-tropical cyclone off the shores of Long Island, New York, and Ocean City, Maryland, according to the National Weather Service.
Hermine is moving northeastward as a powerful post-tropical cyclone and a dangerous storm surge is expected along the coast from Virginia to New Jersey.
Hermine, the first hurricane to make landfall in Florida in 11 years, swept ashore on Friday near the town of St.
Hermine later weakened from its peak wind speed of 80mph to a tropical storm as it moved into southern Georgia.
Lynne Garrett speaks to loved ones as she surveys damage outside her Steinhatchee home from Hurricane Hermine, which made landfall in Tampa, Florida
On the East Coast, most states and their cities are feeling the full brunt of Hurricane Hermine. Florida was the first to experience the wrath of the storm on its northern Gulf Coast with (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-37248359) a reported 70,000 homes losing electrical power at one point.
And if you live in the eastern half of America, there's a chance that some or all of it will be ruined anyway: Hurricane Hermine is bearing down on the southeast, and there's something like a 70% chance of rain in New York on Sunday.
The Florida office of the League of Southeastern Credit Unions & Affiliates and at least eight credit unions closed their offices and branches Thursday afternoon because of the forecasted dangerous high winds, rain, and possible power loss from Hurricane Hermine.
This volume brings together 20 essays and biographies of women from Texas from 1600 to 2000, including Sallie McNeill, Harriet Perry, Adele Briscoe Looscan, Ellen Lawson Dabbs, Mariana Thompson Folson, Jovita Idar, Frances Battaile Fisk, Oveta Culp Hobby, Casey Hayden, Julia Scott Reed, Barbara Jordan, Hermine Tobolowsky, and Mae C.