Herodas


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Herodas

(hĭrō`dāz), fl. 3d cent. B.C., Greek poet. He wrote realistic mimes in choliambic verse often depicting bawdy situations. A papyrus containing some 700 readable lines by Herodes is extant. His name is also spelled Herodes or Herondas.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Mimiambs of Herodas: Translated Into an English 'Choliambic' Metre With Literary-Historical Introductions and Notes
of Canterbury, New Zealand) comments on the eight surviving and fragments of a ninth poem by third-century BC Hellenistic poet Herodas, who seems to have lived in the Doric speaking part of Kos or the nearby mainland.
(1) Walton also includes translations of a mime-writer named Herodas. He does so, presumably, for the sake of completeness, but the question of whether Herodas's mimes were actually dramatic, or meant to be recited or read, is a matter of scholarly controversy.
Early in the last century, they could be counted on to yield a fairly regular harvest of half a dithyramb of Pindar, a scene from Sophocles, a mime by Herodas. But in the past forty years, they have proved far less forthcoming, which is why the announcement of the discovery of 112 new poems by Posidippus has generated great excitement among students of classical poetry.
This fascination can be traced both in parodic mimicry of actual women poets (as shown by Skinner's study of the appropriation of "the gendered gaze" by poets Theocritus and Herodas) and in stylization of a voice of a legendary fourth-century BCE courtesan Phryne in a fictional correspondence composed by Alciphron some six centuries after (Rosenmeyer).
There is a tendency to overwhelm and a tighter control and a greater regard for chronology would help: another page, similarly selected at random, cites Herodas, Democritus, Prodicus, Aristotle, Plato, and Aristophanes and in that order (73).
Hymn 1.55 and 4.204, Herodas 7.155, and many passages in Theocritus.(6) Lucilius (frag.
In pieces of about 100 lines, Herodas portrays vivid and entertaining scenes with the characters clearly drawn.
Herodas, and the Gendered Gaze." In Lardinois and McClure 2001, 201-22.