Herostratos

(redirected from Herostratus)
Also found in: Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Herostratos

 

Dates of birth and death unknown. A Greek from the town of Ephesus (Asia Minor).

In 356 B.C., Herostratos burned the Temple of Artemis of Ephesus, which was considered one of the Seven Wonders of the World, in order to make his name immortal. The legend is that the temple was burned on the night of Alexander the Great’s birth. By decision of the inhabitants of the Ionian cities, the name of Herostratos was to be consigned to eternal oblivion; however, he was mentioned by the ancient Greek historian Theopompus in the fourth century B.C. The name Herostratos acquired a pejorative meaning. It is used to designate ambitious men who seek to achieve fame at any cost.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
* Herostratus, or Eratostratus--an Ephesian, who wantonly set fire to the famous temple of Diana, in order to commemorate his name by so uncommon an action.
197V) (14) and Cervantes (2.8:95), evoke the example of Herostratus, whose inordinate desire for fame led him to burn the temple of Artemis in Ephesus.
Later there's a program for a Bristol, Pa., production of Grigory Gorin's Forget Herostratus!, in which she met her now-husband, David.
Herostratus, a young Greek man who in 356 BCE set fire to the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, may be the world's first documented case of the Streisand Effect.
Most importantly, the incorporation of the historical Herostratus and his 356 BCE burning of Diana's temple at Ephesus with the myth of Cephalus and Procris (truncated to 'Pocris'), all within the framework of the Spanish Baroque musical comedia, represents a noteworthy dramatic innovation by Calderon (Florez 306).
(28) The story of Herostratus who notoriously burnt Efesus for posterity and was condemned rather than praised shows us precisely that distinction was not secured in antiquity just through unprecedented, innovative moves, but through moves that were considered great because of their goodness.
Typical of questions being asked of investigative journalists today is this one: "Do you realize that your article might cost people their jobs?" Hearing this makes us feel like a modern-day Herostratus, accused of being determined to destroy our publications for the sake of our investigative egos.
MORE THAN FORTY YEARS after its premiere at London's Institute of Contemporary Arts in 1967, Don Levy's Herostratus has been given a second chance at recognition, if not at the fame that is, ostensibly, its subject.
(6) Kerry Sabbag, "Cain and Herostratus: Pushkin and Shaffer's Reappropriations of the Mozart Myth," Pushkin Review 6-7 (2004): 25-37.
*** Herostratus (15) 1967 meditation on the cult of celebrity as a poet hires a PR company to turn his suicide into a mass-media spectacle.
The London-born actress has come a long way since her film debut at 22 in Herostratus.
In 356 BC the otherwise wholly insignificant Herostratus set fire to the great temple of Artemis at Ephesus--one of the seven wonders of the ancient world--allegedly for no better reason than to win notoriety.