hertz

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Related to Hertzian: Hertzian waves

hertz

(hûrts) [for Heinrich R. HertzHertz, Heinrich Rudolf
, 1857–94, German physicist. He confirmed J. C. Maxwell's electromagnetic theory and in the course of experiments (1886–89) produced and studied electromagnetic waves (known also as hertzian waves, or radio waves).
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], abbr. Hz, unit of frequency, equal to 1 cycle per second. The term is combined with metric prefixes to denote multiple units such as the kilohertz (1,000 Hz), megahertz (1,000,000 Hz), and gigahertz (1,000,000,000 Hz).

hertz

(herts) Symbol: Hz. The SI unit of frequency, defined as the frequency of a periodic phenomenon that has a period of one second. The frequency range of electromagnetic radiation is about 3000 Hz (very low frequency radio waves) to about 1022 Hz (high-frequency gamma rays).

hertz

[hərts]
(physics)
Unit of frequency; a periodic oscillation has a frequency of n hertz if in 1 second it goes through n cycles. Also known as cycle per second (cps). Symbolized Hz.

hertz

A unit of frequency, abbr. Hz; one cycle per second.

hertz

hertz
The frequency of any cyclic repetition. One hertz (Hz) is one cycle per second. The number of cycles per second is expressed in hertz. Kilohertz (kHz) is a frequency of one thousand cycles per second. Megahertz (MHz) is a frequency of one million cycles per second. The term is named after Heinrich Hertz, a German physicist (1857–1894). Also called a cycle.

hertz

the derived SI unit of frequency; the frequency of a periodic phenomenon that has a periodic time of 1 second; 1 cycle per second.

Hertz

1. Gustav . 1887--1975, German atomic physicist. He provided evidence for the quantum theory by his research with Franck on the effects produced by bombarding atoms with electrons: they shared the Nobel prize for physics (1925)
2. Heinrich Rudolph . 1857--94, German physicist. He was the first to produce electromagnetic waves artificially

Hertz

Abbreviated "Hz," one Hertz is equal to one cycle per second. In 1883, Heinrich Hertz detected electromagnetic waves, and his name was adopted to measure the number of electromagnetic waves, or cycles, in a signal. Hertz is widely used to refer to the clock rate of a CPU; for example, 2 GHz means two billion cycles per second. The term is also used for other repeating cycles such as frame rate; for example, a 60 Hz TV displays 60 frames per second. See MHz, GHz and space/time.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 The contact stress calculated by FEM is larger than the Hertzian contact stress obtained from the Hertzian stress formulae (see Appendix A) and AGMA stress formulae (see Appendix B).
N] are the Hertzian constants of the screw and nut, respectively, determined by the material properties and geometries the ball and screw/nut.
Greenwood, "Analysis of elliptical Hertzian contacts," Tribology International, vol.
0] Height of transmitting dipole 60 m x Height of observation 15m point (receiver) I Current of the radiating 1:00 AM Hertzian dipole (1) 2h Length of the Hertzian dipole (2) 0.
The geometry of the electromagnetic six-vector, the electromagnetic energy and the Hertzian tensor," C.
Generalized Hertzian Model for the Deformation and Cracking of Colloidal Packings Saturated with Liquid.
The role of the European and national authorities was established in Lisbon's 2000 Conference on DTT, in which the participants agreed that while the Governments are responsible for executing the technological change in the Hertzian broadcasting system within their territories, the European Union must "coordinate and facilitate the exchange of information between States" (Suarez-Candel, 2009: 257-259).
In our approach, we consider that the Hertzian model holds for all contacts.
The accuracy of the FEM results was verified by comparing the nominal values of the Hertzian pressure as well as the nominal tooth root stress, assuming a uniform load distribution to the three planets, i.
Lubrication related failures include Hertzian fatigue, wear and scuffing.
Under s 1(1), "broadcasting" is defined as "the dissemination of writing, signs, signals, pictures and sounds of all kinds, intended to be received by the public either directly or through the medium of relay stations, by means of, (a) any form of wireless radioelectric communication utilizing Hertzian waves, including radiotelegraph and radiotelephone, or (b) cables, wires, fibre-optic linkages or laser beams.