Hesperis


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Hesperis

 

a genus of plants of the family Cruciferae. The plants are biennial or perennial herbs with violet, white, or yellowish-green flowers; the fruits are pods. There are 25 to 30 species, which grow primarily in the eastern Mediterranean region; in the USSR there are about ten species. The most prevalent in the southern European part of the USSR is dame’s violet (H. matronalis), which has violet flowers that smell pleasant in the evening. It is frequently grown as a decorative fragrant plant.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
But plant-wise the journey is far-ranging, what with stops for chatter about sweet rocket (Hesperis matronalis, you can eat the flowers), California poppies (Eschscholzia californica, and not really poppies at all), comfrey (Symphytum officinale, a bee magnet but it will take over your garden), blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum, related to the huckleberries scattered through the Coast Range) and common mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris, the whole genus has medicinal uses).
Nearby are purple flowered geraniums and another biennial plant, hesperis, the sweet rocket with its 3ft tall shoots covered in sweet smelling mauve flowers.
Marion, "Note sur le peuplement de Tanger a l'epoque romaine," Hesperis, 35 (1948): 125-30.
rapa [202] Cleome anomala Kunth [142] Hesperis matronalis L.
Anthony Disney (Brookfield: Variorum, 1995), 85-111; Andrzej Dziubinski, "L'armee et la flotte de guerre marocaines a l'epoque des sultans de la dynastie saadienne," Hesperis Tamuda 13 (1972), 61-94.
Burning bush, winged spindletree Hesperis matronalis L.
A personal favourite is sweet rocket (Hesperis matronalis), particularly the double form, which goes back to Tudor times.
Vajda in 1951 (Hesperis, 12), liturgical pieces like the Passover Haggadah or other elements of ritual, the public teaching of adults and women through the intermediary of the drashah, `preaching' on the Sabbath, feast-days and special points in the Jewish calendar, which makes use of traditional homiletic literature, the Midrash and Aggadah, the world of Jewish legend and the imaginary and folkloric world of local mythology.
The apples in 'the orchard of the Hesperides' (175) which Antonio mentions were guarded by the Hesperides (daughters of Atlas and Hesperis), who were in turn aided by the dragon Ladon, offspring of the giant Tython.