Hestia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Hestia

(hĕs`tēə), in Greek religion and mythology, goddess of the hearth; daughter of Kronos and Rhea. Both public and private worship of Hestia were widespread; she represented personal and communal security and happiness. An Olympian goddess, she was thought of as the kindest and mildest of the gods. She was of little mythological importance, appearing in only a few stories. The Romans identified her with VestaVesta,
in Roman religion and mythology, hearth goddess. She was highly honored in every household from early times to the beginning of Christianity. Her public cult maintained a sacred building in which her priestesses, the vestal virgins, tended the communal hearth and fire,
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Hestia

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Hestia, asteroid 46 (the 46th asteroid to be discovered, on August 16, 1857), is approximately 164 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 4 years. It was named after the Greek virgin goddess of the hearth and symbol of the home (parallel to the Roman Vesta). Hestia was the oldest and most sacred of the 12 Olympian dieties. As with the asteroid Vesta, the natal location of Hestia by sign and house indicates something about the native’s domestic inclinations. When prominent in a natal chart (e.g., conjunct the Sun or the ascendant), it can indicate a homebody.

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Room, Adrian. Dictionary of Astronomical Names. London: Routledge, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.
References in periodicals archive ?
Five years after the end of Op HESTIA, questions remain about the government's hasty preparation for the mission in earthquake-ravaged Haiti, but that has little to do with the exemplary work Canadian soldiers performed once their boots hit the ground.
Gemma cites her main inspiration as the young people involved with Hestia Careers and believes that the hard-work she has invested in the brand is returned by the team she has developed.
Hestia living will open the refurbished hotel in May 2012 after it has been carefully designed with the seniors in mind.
Hestia director of consultancy Keith Bennett said: "There are already a number of significant programmes of work taking place across the city and the wider region that could support, and benefit from, a full decentralised feasibility study.
Mirivilis, Stratis: La vida en una tumba, Hestia 1985, (1a 1924).
The Hestia luminaire won the 2002 Lighting Design Award for Innovation.
For instance, when she told the story of Hestia, who said.
We know from the Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite that Hestia, goddess of the hearth, was one of the three goddesses who would have nothing to do with the works of Aphrodite.
The Olympic Flame dates back to ancient Greece where Olympia, a sanctuary dedicated to the ancient goddess Hestia, housed the glowing embers.
He then became the king of the Titans and took for his consort his sister Rhea; she bore by him Hestia, Demeter, Hera, Hades, and Poseidon, all of whom he swallowed because his own parents had warned that he would be overthrown by his own child.
Said to mark the center of the world, this holy object, protruding from the surface and reaching down like an umbilicus into the entrails of the earth, became known as the omphalos, or navel--boss, the literal seat of Hestia, goddess of the Hearth (Roussel 1911, 86--91; Audia 1932, 299--317).
Learning from Ge that one of his sons would dethrone him, he swallowed his children, Hestia,