heterocyclic compound

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Related to Heterocyclic amines: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

heterocyclic compound

[‚hed·ə·rō′sī·klik ¦käm‚pau̇nd]
(organic chemistry)
Compound in which the ring structure is a combination of more than one kind of atom; for example, pyridine, C5H5N.
References in periodicals archive ?
To prove this effect, researchers exposed xanthohumol-supplemented healthy rats to a common family of dietary carcinogens (called heterocyclic amines) that forms when meat is cooked at high temperatures.
Formation and human risk of carcinogenic heterocyclic amines formed from natural precursors in meat.
You can't take the heme iron out of meat, but you can minimize the heterocyclic amines (HCAs) when you grill meat, chicken, or fish.
Food Borne Carcinogens: Heterocyclic Amines. John Wiley & Sons, LTD, Chichester, NY, 2000.
Complex formation of heterocyclic amines with porphyrins: its use in detection and prevention.
For human evidence on heterocyclic amines and four organo-chlorines, we relied on other authoritative reviews (Brody et al.
Cooking meat may lead to carcinogenic heterocyclic amines. Fiber reduces fecal transit time, dilute carcinogens and adsorb heterocyclic amines.
Also, red meat is often cooked at high temperatures that can lead to charring, which can increase the presence of probable cancer-causing compounds called heterocyclic amines.
They include acrylamide ( found in carbohydrate-rich foods such as French fries), heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ( chemicals formed when meat is cooked at high temperatures), aldehyde (an organic compound found in perfume) and acrolein (a chemical found in herbicides).
Cooking meats at very high temperatures--whether it's grilling, searing in a frying pan or broiling--causes amino acids in beef, pork, poultry and fish to form chemicals known as heterocyclic amines (HCAs).
"The more brown the meat is, the more likely it is that heterocyclic amines have formed on the surface," says Sinha.
As fat from the meat drips down onto heated coals or burners, the flame rises and deposits carcinogens called heterocyclic amines (HCA) on your burgers.