heterocyclic compound

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Related to Heterocyclic amines: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

heterocyclic compound

[‚hed·ə·rō′sī·klik ¦käm‚pau̇nd]
(organic chemistry)
Compound in which the ring structure is a combination of more than one kind of atom; for example, pyridine, C5H5N.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cooking meats can result in the production of mutagens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) or heterocyclic amines.
Keywords: Carbon steel; Corrosion Inhibiters; Heterocyclic amine derivatives; Potentiostatic polarization; Weight loss
3-10) The important point related to this discussion is that sulforaphane inactivates the cancer-causing effects of heterocyclic amines.
Heterocyclic amines are of concern because they can inadvertently be formed when beef patties are cooked to the doneness recommended for killing unwanted microbes, such as E.
Research conducted by microbiologist Sadhana Ravishankar has shown that a compound in oregano reduces the formation of heterocyclic amines, the potentially cancer-causing culprits that can gather in grilled meat.
She also notes that frying can create carcinogenic compounds called heterocyclic amines (HCAs), which can damage DNA and contribute to development of cancer, particularly in the colon and stomach.
Latest Developments in the Analysis of Heterocyclic Amines in Cooked Foods.
As meat is grilled, cancer-causing chemicals called heterocyclic amines form on its surface, suggesting an explanation for the higher cancer rates in meat-eaters, compared with vegetarians.
These heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are carcinogenic and are formed from the cooking of meats such as beef, pork and chicken.
These heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are carcinogenic and formed by cooking meats such as beef, pork and chicken.
For example, heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are the carcinogenic chemicals formed from the cooking of muscle meats such as beef, pork, fowl, and fish.
According to researchers from the University of Porto, the beer or red wine marinade reduced levels of heterocyclic amines by up to 88 per cent.