Heusler alloy


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Heusler alloy

[′hȯis·lər ‚al‚ȯi]
(metallurgy)
Any of a group of ferromagnetic nonferrous alloys typically composed of 18-25% manganese, 10-25% aluminum, and the balance copper.
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"Co-occurrence of magnetic and structural transitions in the Heusler alloy Ni 53 Mn 25 Ga 22." Applied physics letters, Vol.
"Microstructure and magnetic properties of Ni 50 Mn 37 Sn 13 Heusler alloy ribbons." Journal of Applied Physics, Vol.
"As a final validation, we attempted the synthesis of a few of the predicted compounds and produced two new magnets," the researchers said in (http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/4/e1602241) the paper , titled "Accelerated discovery of new magnets in the Heusler alloy family." Being Heusler alloys, they both contained manganese and two other elements; one of them had cobalt and titanium, while the other contained platinum and palladium.
The next class of materials that were investigated were the Heusler alloy series R [Pd.sub.2]Sn, (66-67) followed quickly by the cuprate superconductors (e.g., R [Ba.sub.2][Cu.sub.3][O.sub.6+x]) which offer new and interesting perspectives into our understanding of "magnetic superconductors" (68-85).
The device consists of a low loss Heusler alloy material as the ferromagnetic electrode, a doped Ge/SiGe quantum well as the spin channel, and a metal gate with a high spin-orbit interaction for enhancing the voltage control of the spins in the spin channel via the Rashba effect.
Chen, "Modelling high-power spin-torque oscillator with perpendicular magnetization in half-metallic Heusler alloy spin valve nanopillar," Journal of Alloys and Compounds, vol.
Objective: "The proposed HARFIR project intends to develop antiferromagnetic (AF) Heusler alloy (HA) films to replace the antiferromagnetic alloy Iridium Manganese (IrMn), which has been widely used in all spin electronic devices including hard disk drives and next-generation magnetic memories.
This allows a rapid cycling or testing of feasible compositions that means we can explore the potential plasmonic properties of new materials systems such novel oxides, heusler alloys etc and at different wavelength of interest.
To date, the largest MCEs have been reported in materials such as [Gd.sub.5][Si.sub.2][Ge.sub.2] [3], MnFe(P,As) [4], La[Fe.sub.13-x][Si.sub.x] [5], NiMn(Ga,Sb,In) based Heusler alloys [6], and Mn[As.sub.1-x][Sb.sub.x] [7], which all show first-order crystallographic and magnetic phase transitions simultaneously, that is, magnetostructural transitions (MSTs).
Balancing theory and experiment, 12 invited, peer-reviewed papers explore the materials from such perspectives as combing magnetism and ferroelectricity towards multiferroicity, intrinsic free electrons/holes at polarization discontinuities and their implications for the basics of ferroelectricity and its origin, molecular spintronics, recent applications of Landau-Ginzburg theory to ferroelectric superlattices, ferromagnetic shape memory Heusler alloys, and dielectric relaxation phenomena in some lead and non-lead based ferroelectric relaxor materials.
Subjects include sample preparation for experimentation, thermal treatments and phase stability, magnetic and structural characterization, alloys suitable for applications at the micro scale, resistance and magnetocaloric effects, with papers covering physical phenomena in magnetic shape memory science, main patterns in NiMnGa films, ferromagnetic materials in silicon wafers, transformations in NiMnGa alloys, acoustic energy absorption, shape memory alloys in polymer composites, hybridization effects, and properties of Heusler alloys.
They are structurally comparable to their parent compounds, the Heusler alloys (M[Ni.sub.2]Sn) that have all the four sub-lattices occupied by Ni atoms.