HiLog

HiLog

A higher-order logic programming language. An extension of normal logic programming where predicate symbols may be variable or structured. This allows unification to be performed on the predicate symbols themselves in addition to their arguments.

ftp://sbcs.sunysb.edu/SB-hilog.

["HiLog as a Platform for Database Languages (Or Why Predicate Calculus is Not Enough)", W. Chen et al, Stony Brook, 2nd Intl Workshop on Database Prog Langs, Morgan Kaufmann, 1989].
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The HILOG analysis compared accurate responses with inaccurate responses.
Consistent with the HILOG reported earlier, analysis of data from the TA condition indicated that the frequency of false identifications were higher under short exposure conditions, [chi square] (1,82) = 14.
Over the past several years, a number of richer and more expressive logic programming languages have been proposed and implemented, such as LOGIN [Ait-Kaci and Nasr 1986], LIFE [Ait-Kaci and Nash 1986], HiLog [Chen et al.
In this section, we examine four different Datalog extensions: LDL, COL, Hilog and Relationlog.
Hilog [Chen and Chu 1989; Chen and Kambayashi 1991] is a typed extension of Datalog intended to solve some of the problems of LDL.
With the unique-name assumption, nested terms in Hilog can be directly used as atoms.
The parentsof relation can be expressed in Hilog as follows:
However, the special treatment of sets in Hilog has its limitations since it does not allow us to specify explicitly what a set exactly contains.
The Hilog language is not higher-order in the sense that we cannot use variables for the names associated with the sets and tuples.
Relationlog combines the best features of LDL, COL and Hilog.
A partial set term has the form <X, Y, Z> and corresponds to a Hilog set term p{X, Y, Z} for some name p.
When a partial set term appears in the body, it denotes part of a set, as in Hilog.