Hibiscus cannabinus


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Related to Hibiscus cannabinus: Hibiscus sabdariffa

Hibiscus cannabinus

[hī‚bis·kəs kə′nab·ə·nəs]
(agriculture)
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References in periodicals archive ?
[1.] Danalatos NG, Archontoulis SV Growth and biomass productivity of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus, L.) under different agricultural inputs and management practices in central Greece.
Occurrence of a Begomovirus with yellow vein mosaic disease of mesta (Hibiscus cannabinus and Hibiscus sabdariffa).
In the present study, we defined the optimum harvesting dates, in terms of yield and nutritive value, of novel Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) cultivars used to prepare silage, and explored silage mineral and amino acid compositions and the microorganisms present.
Therefore, this study was undertaken to: 1) elucidate the potential of Jatropha curcas and Hibiscus cannabinus to clean up toxic heavy metals in soils treated with sewage sludge; and 2) to determine the availability and relative distribution of various forms of the metals in the sewage sludge and treated soils.
Zhao, "Direct shoot organogenesis and plant regeneration from cotyledonary node of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.)," African Journal of Biotechnology, vol.
Fresh leafy vegetable samples of amaranthus (Amaranthus spinosus), garden egg (Solanum macrocapon), kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus), roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) commonly used for culinary preparations in the regions of northern Ghana (savannah zone) were sourced from market centres in Navrongo (Upper East Region) and Tamale (Northern Region).
Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), a member of the Malvaceae family endemic to Africa (Bassam, 1998) is a warm-season, annual, herbaceous plant that produces high quality cellulose.
Wedge, "Phytotoxic and fungitoxic activities of the essential oil of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) leaves and its composition," Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.
This result is in agreement with those of other researchers who found a decrease in the zinc content of the leaves of Hibiscus sabdariffa and Hibiscus cannabinus and also in other similar leafy vegetables such as Amaranthus blitum, Amaranthy gongecus and Spineces olerecea between 15 and 45 days after sowing [12].
Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) is a fast growing tropical and subtropical plant that can grow to 5 m in height and yield about 14 tons/ha of biomass.
Nutritional and yield evaluation of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) as a potential high quality forage for the southeastern United States.