Hidatsa


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Hidatsa

(hēdät`sä), Native North Americans, also known as the Minitari and the Gros Ventre. Their language belongs to the Siouan branch of the Hokan-Siouan linguistic stock (see Native American languagesNative American languages,
languages of the native peoples of the Western Hemisphere and their descendants. A number of the Native American languages that were spoken at the time of the European arrival in the New World in the late 15th cent.
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). After their separation from the CrowCrow,
indigenous people of North America whose language belongs to the Siouan branch of the Hokan-Siouan linguistic stock (see Native American languages) and who call themselves the Absaroka, or bird people.
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, with whom they were united before the historic period, they occupied several agricultural villages on the upper Missouri River in North Dakota and were in close alliance with the occupants of other villages, the ArikaraArikara
, Native North Americans whose language belongs to the Caddoan branch of the Hokan-Siouan linguistic stock (see Native American languages). Archaeological evidence shows that they occupied the banks of the upper Missouri River since at least the 14th cent.
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 and the MandanMandan
, indigenous people of North America whose language belongs to the Siouan branch of the Hokan-Siouan linguistic stock (see Native American languages). The Mandan were a sedentary tribe of the Plains area and were culturally connected with their neighbors on the Missouri
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. The Hidatsa villages, with circular earth lodges, were enclosed by an earthen wall. Among other Hidatsa traits were the cultivation of corn and an annual organized buffalo hunt. They had a complex social organization and elaborate ceremonies, including the sun dance. After the smallpox epidemic of 1837, they moved up the Missouri and established themselves close to the trading post of Fort Berthold. Together with the Arikara and Mandan, many Hidatsa reside on the Fort Berthold Reservation in North Dakota. There were some 1,500 Hidatsa in the United States in 1990.

Bibliography

See A. W. Bowers, Hidatsa Social and Ceremonial Organization (1965).

References in periodicals archive ?
The Hidatsa (Gros Ventre of the Misouri) or Atsina (Gros Ventre of the Prairie) are offered as less likely alternatives for the shirt's origin.
New Town, ND:Natural Resources Staff, Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara Nation (2014).
The Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation, also known as the Three Affiliated Tribes, maintains a website containing historical information: http://www.
The Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nations in North Dakota, for example, concluded an agreement with the state in which they operate three tribal schools as public school districts and receive state funds.
1963/1992, Hidatsa Social and Ceremonial Organization, Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press.
In Strate, a non-Indian contractor driving a truck hit and severely injured a woman driving on a highway in the heart of the Fort Berthold Reservation, the home of Mandan Hidatsa and Arikara Nation.
Basandose en la informacion sobre los Hidatsa, Spector utiliza patrones generales por los que las actividades de subsistencia se dividen por edad y sexo, y usa las relaciones que se establecen entre esta diferenciacion sexual del trabajo, la localizacion espaciotemporal y la evidencia material con el objeto de analizar las relaciones de genero.
Neil is a member of the Mandan Hidatsa tribe, and Alicia is a Chipawa.
Published in 1917, the book describes traditional agricultural practices of the Hidatsa tribe as described by Maxi'diwiac, or Buffalo Bird Woman.
The following example from Hidatsa (Amerind) contains such a quantifying element (glossed as ITERative MOOD in the grammar):
Other projects supported by NativeEnergy include a 65-kilowatt turbine erected in 2005 by the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara nations in North Dakota, and three 100-kilowatt turbines in the village of Toksook Bay, Alaska that went online in 2006.
The others are established writers and represent many of the tribes that Lewis and Clark met--Salish, Shoshone, Hidatsa, Mandan, Nez Perce, and Clatsop, among others.