Hierapolis


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Related to Hierapolis: Laodicea, Colossae

Hierapolis

(hīərăp`əlĭs), ancient city of Phrygia, W Asia Minor, 7 mi (11.3 km) N of Laodicea and on a plateau 500 ft (152 m) above the Lycus valley (in present-day Turkey). Devoted to the worship of Leto in ancient times, it became an early seat of Christianity (Colossians 4.13). The Romans greatly enlarged and improved the city, building a large theater and numerous baths about the hot springs for which the site is famous. Near the city was a deep chasm called the Plutonium, which the ancients thought led to the nether regions; the fissure no longer exists. Extensive ruins survive from the Roman and Christian periods.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In 488 Xenaias (Philoxenus), Monophysite bishop of Hierapolis in Syria (d.
O templo de Hierapolis, segundo ele, era o de maior destaque, sendo o primeiro em tamanho, numero de adeptos (que mais promovia peregrinacoes e festas), riqueza que arrecadava (diz o autor que o templo recebia somas enormes da Arabia, Fenicia, Babilonia e Capadocia) e de beleza esplendorosa.
According to historic sources, the site was located in the ancient Phrygian city of Hierapolis, now called Pamukkale, and the opening was described as filled with lethal mephitic vapors.
Historical records show that Tripoli was one of the three most important cities in the second century BC, along with Hierapolis and Laodicea.
The second is a five-volume work by Papias, bishop of Hierapolis, that is known only in later citations.
Hierapolis di Frigia: Contributi allo studio dell'architettura
The main shrine of the famous Syrian fertility goddess was at the 'holy city', Hierapolis, also called Bambyce, some 120 miles north-east of Hama(th), close to the River Euphrates.
The ancient Greco-Roman and Byzantine city of Hierapolis was built on top of the white "castle" which is in total about 2,700 metres long, 600 meters wide and 160 meters high.
Others have examined the impact of denomination on financial fraud and controls (West & Zech, 2008; Elson, Callaghan, Walker, & John, 2007; Metropolitan Germanos (Polizoides) of Hierapolis, 2010).
The tour continues to the 13th-century Seljuk masterpiece, the Sultanhan Caravanserai; the Mausoleum of Mevlana (original home of the Whirling Dervishes) in Konya; and Pamukkale, to visit the ruins of the ancient spa city of Hierapolis, the Necropolis, and the terraces and pools of the dazzling limestone cascade.
Aelius Glykon and Aurelia Amia in Hierapolis. This section draws out the overlapping and multifaceted strands of identity that cross what we now see as religious, ethnic, national, and professional boundaries.