HDCP

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HDCP

(High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection) An encryption system for enforcing digital rights management (DRM) over DVI, DisplayPort and HDMI interfaces. The copy protection system (DRM) resides in the computer, DVD player or set-top box. If it determines the video material must be protected, it encrypts the signal via HDCP and transmits it to the display system, which decrypts it. For more information, visit Digital Content Protection, LLC at www.digital-cp.com. See DVI and HDMI.
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HDCP High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) [10] is a form of Digital Rights Management (DRM) developed by Intel Corporation to control digital audio and video content as it travels across Digital Visual Interface (DVI) or High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) connections.
High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) technologies are understood to protect digital motion pictures, TV programs and audio against unauthorised interception and copying between a digital set top box or digital video recorder and a digital TV or PC.
The consumer electronics business is leveraging HDMI and HDCP (High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection) to create a scalable, secure media delivery architecture that enables anytime, anywhere availability of rich digital content.
The L30W36's digital visual interface provides an uncompressed transfer of high-definition video from a digital video source to a digital display device, while High-Bandwidth Digital Content Protection ensures copy protection of the content displayed.
The AD9882 supports High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP), allowing viewing of content encrypted with the Intel HDCP version 1.0 standard.