Hildegard of Bingen


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Hildegard of Bingen

Saint. 1098--1179, German abbess, poet, composer, and mystic
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It is to be hoped that innovative companies will continue to bring both new discoveries, like Hildegard of Bingen, and new versions of established masterpieces by composers such as Handel and Schubert, to the ever expanding audience.
In his new commentary, Hildegard of Bingen: A Saint for Our Times, with a foreword by Joan Chittister, Matthew Fox notes, "Curiously, Hildegard writes and draws pictures of what she calls 'fireballs' that enter the human baby when we are born.
Writer/director Margarethe Von Trotta's new film, "Vision: From the Life of Hildegard of Bingen," is a filmed version of the life of a thoroughly "renaissance" woman who was born and lived during the Middle Ages.
Hildegard of Bingen and her gospel homilies; speaking new mysteries.
As someone whose vocation for 25 years has been to encourage the voices of young women and men, I would suggest that the Bible and the Christian tradition have other stories to tell as well: of the Canaanite woman who challenged Jesus' reluctance to heal her daughter, of the early Christian leaders Phoebe and Prisca who were some of the first Christian missionaries, of the 12th-century abbess Hildegard of Bingen who was known for her preaching and even for admonishing the clergy for their failures--these women are hardly examples of pure receptivity.
Two articles focus on Hildegard of Bingen, while another centers on Heloise ("Educating Heloise" by W.
This programme of music, words and images of Hildegard of Bingen carried much strength.
says of Hildegard of Bingen that "it is necessary to keep in mind how strongly she herself was male-identified and part of the male-identified church, how thoroughly she despised her own sex .
Hildegard of Bingen, a 12th-century German mystic, the pope says clergy abuse needs conversion and not structural change.
Of interest to medievalists in art history, French, music, and drama, the papers reflect the writers' research on specific works and monuments, with topics that include the performative use of exterior inscriptions on Armenian churches, dramatic exegesis in Hildegard of Bingen, and the performance and staging of Passion plays.
A twelfth-century miniature by Christian mystic Hildegard of Bingen shows this perspective graphically by depicting the descent of the soul directly into the fetus of the mother.