lesion

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Related to Hill-Sachs lesion: reverse Hill Sachs lesion, Bankart lesion

lesion

any structural change in a bodily part resulting from injury or disease
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

lesion

[′lē·zhən]
(biology)
A structural or functional alteration due to injury or disease.
(cell and molecular biology)
A damaged site in a gene, chromosome, or protein molecule.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(5) The ISIS is a questionnaire consisting of sport played, age greater than or less than 20 years, shoulder hyperlaxity, and the presence of a Hill-Sachs lesion or loss of glenoid contour on an anteriorposterior shoulder radiograph.
Delimar, "Hill-Sachs lesion in recurrent shoulder dislocation: sonographic detection," Journal ofUltrasound in Medicine, vol.
C, 3D CT of left shoulder showing Hill-Sachs lesion. To view this figure in color, see www.hjdbulletin.org.
Apart from the severity of injury and fracture deformity, the final prognosis is further affected by the extent of the underlying glenoid or reverse Hill-Sachs lesion (4, 5); the focus is concentrated on treatment of the anteromedial defect of the humeral head.
One surgical technique associated with the mechanism of onset is the use of remplissage to treat Hill-Sachs lesions [7].
The Hill-Sachs lesion, as it has come to be known, was originally described as a "compression fracture" of the posterolateral humeral head manifested as a line of condensation that appears on radiographs best identified on the internal rotation view.
Hill-Sachs lesions have classically been best viewed with a combination of internal rotation and a Stryker-Notch view.
A few papers outline treatment strategies for large reverse Hill-Sachs lesions acquired from locked posterior dislocations.
The patient may experience apprehension with the shoulder in abduction and external rotation that may not be relieved by posteriorly directed pressure over the anterior shoulder (relocation test), as this maneuver cannot account for the patient's sensation of "falling into" the Hill-Sachs lesion.
Assessment of coincidence and defect sizes in Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions after anterior shoulder dislocation: a radiological study.
For the shoulder specialist, we include an algorithm of the treatment of Hill-Sachs lesions and discuss the role of biceps tenodesis in SLAP tears.
Recent reports in the orthopaedic literature have shown promising results of osteochondral allograft implantation for cases of glenohumeral instability including engaging Hill-Sachs lesions and glenoid bone defects.