Himeros

Himeros

god of erotic desire; attendant of Aphrodite. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 131]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Now, the YouTube star is creating a whole new way to experience gay erotica through HimEros.tv, which aims to enhance gay men's sexual experiences by focusing on ecstasy through intimacy
I would add to Katz's observations that before Penelope takes each step towards remarriage, she first "takes satisfaction of tearful lamentation" (tarphe poludakrutoio gooio, 19.251 = 21.57), that is, she fulfills her "desire for lamentation" (himeros gooio, 19.249) for the time being, at least.
Of the major early sources for the Olympian gods, only Hesiod (Theogony, 116-20) writes about Eros, and then only as an attendant at Aphrodite's birth, where he is joined by Himeros, the personification of desire or longing (depicted in an oil flask from the 4th century BC; Fig.
The opening chapter of this part is aptly entitled Pothos: aptly because this term, as opposed, for instance, to himeros, implies an absence to be filled, and thus represents the force driving the narrative forward, to the fulfillment of marriage and return.
Parmi d'autres contes et romans, on note quelques titres prometteurs sur le sujet en question: "Himeros ou les Insatisfaits," "Les Hypocrites," mais aussi un "Essai sur le Frolement," ainsi que "Le Demon de Stagyre," essai de critique du sentiment.
One puzzle, notes Thomas, is that debris from two other large craters, Himeros and Psyche, don't seem to have made a significant contribution to the larger rocks observed on the asteroid's surface.
Hesiod places the goddess near the beginning of the genealogy of the gods, and he notes that she "was attended by Eros and by Himeros (Desire) from the time of her birth when she went to live with the gods" (11.201-202).
The chief associates of Eros were Pothos and Himeros (Longing and Desire).
14.214-17) are philotes (love), himeros (longing, erotic desire), and oaristus parphasis (alluring whisper), the very tools through which Aphrodite/Venus and Hera seduce their male lovers/consorts.