Himyarite

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Related to Himyarites: Minaean Kingdom

Himyarite

a member of an ancient people of SW Arabia, sometimes regarded as including the Sabeans
References in periodicals archive ?
In Pseudo-Dionysius of Tel-Mahre's chronicle, the brief reference to the conversion of the Himyarites precedes rather than follows the Christianization of Axum; moreover, there is another substantial entry in between, also drawn from Socrates (HE 1.13), regarding Constantine's construction of churches and anti-pagan measures.
Likely derived from the Book of the Himyarites, this passage is discussed by Irfan Shahid, Byzantium and the Arabs in the Fifth Century (Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks, 1989), 361-70, but he offers no further explanation for the Jewish captive turned queen.
It is a veritable encyclopaedia of almost everything to do with Himyarite culture and its capital at Zafar.
The Himyarites, though not actually Muslim, are to be regarded as larger than life.
Looking in the other direction, and certainly more spectacularly, Ehret (1998:275) has just suggested that the Himyarites (Nabateans?) were the governors and establishers of the fabled entrepot of Rhapta which appears in the Periplus -- a profoundly wider trade scope than usually attributed to the Nabateans and/or their allies and partners.
Following his conversion to Judaism, Dhu-Nuwas assumed an additional Hebrew name -- Yussuf (Joseph), but Christian sources, notably the Syrian Boor of the Himyarites and The History of the Nestorians, give his name as Masrug.
Despite its important position at the juncture of key moments and places implicated in global cultural change, the Himyarites have been little studied or written about in contemporary western scholarship.
What is particularly original in Fowden's historical model is that he broadens the background to include, not merely the Greeks, Romans, and Persians, but the Egyptians, Syrians, Armenians, pre-Islamic Arabs, Himyarites, Ethiopians, and Nubians.
In the entire twentieth century only two literary documents were discovered on the history of south Arabia in the sixth century, namely, the Book of the Himyarites and the second Letter of Simeon of Beth-Arsham.
From about 1000 BC this region of the Southern Arabian Peninsula was ruled by three successive civilizations -- Minean, Sabaean and Himyarite. These three kingdoms all depended for their wealth on the spice trade.
A farmer has discovered a water tunnel dating back to the Himyarite era or earlier in the Al-Zabal valley, Maifa'a, Ans, Dhamar.
The Himyarite Empire was the last of Yemen's ancient kingdoms.