Hindenburg, the

Hindenburg, the

German airship blew up upon mooring in New Jersey (1937). [Am. Hist.: NCE, 43]
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike old blimps like the Hindenburg, the Airlander 10 utilizes helium, a non-combustable gas, to stay afloat.
It is this final, unquestionably ignominious chapter in an otherwise distinguished career that continues to define historical interest in Hindenburg, the politician.
According to Anna von der Goltz, however, we have consistently underestimated the role of Hindenburg, the myth.
Sam MacDonald uses parts from SMS Hindenburg, the last German ship scuttled in 1918 at Scapa Flow in the Orkneys, where he lives.
The 804-foot Hindenburg, the largest aircraft ever to fly, carried about 1,600 passengers between Germany and the United States in 10 flights in 1936.
The dirigible, which had been invented by Zeppelin thirty-seven years earlier, came to an end as a major aeronautic device in May 6, 1937, when the German dirigible Hindenburg, the largest ever built, exploded and burned at Lakehurst, New Jersey.