Hindu

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Related to Hindoo: Hindu

Hindu

, Hindoo
1. a person who adheres to Hinduism
2. an inhabitant or native of Hindustan or India, esp one adhering to Hinduism
References in classic literature ?
It was the body of an old man, gorgeously arrayed in the habiliments of a rajah, wearing, as in life, a turban embroidered with pearls, a robe of tissue of silk and gold, a scarf of cashmere sewed with diamonds, and the magnificent weapons of a Hindoo prince.
Oh, it is only that Hindoo humbug," growled Harris; "but I don't know what the deuce he's doing here.
The truth is, I make a collection of these curious stories, which often contain, as in the case of our Hindoo friend, elements which can hardly be put into a police report.
He who created the Hindoos, who are preserved by Vishnu
A description of the semi-buoyant eggs and early developmental stages of the goldeye, Hindoo alosoides (Rafinesque).
In her Translation of the Letters of a Hindoo Rajah (1796), the Rajah, after reading the "authentic memoirs" of a nobleman, comes to the conclusion that marriage in Europe is constructed "from the most pure and disinterested motives" ([1796] 1999, 191) and that therefore it is only the obstinacy and folly of women that "alone can possibly prevent their advancement to the very summit of felicity
Tenders are invited for printing of commemorative volume to be published on the occasion of bicentenary of hindoo college and presidency college/ university, kolkata
In the early 1850s in the midst of a debate about the extension of the EIC charter, the paper quoted at length an 1838 report from Charles Trevalyan that argued, "[I]n the Hindoo system, history is made up of fables .
In 1891 he leaves America to further his study at the Sorbonne (the Practical School of High Studies, Paris), where he takes on courses on Sanskrit, Pali and Hindoo philosophy (including buddhism).
We were reading, the other day, in a book of travels in Asia, that a Hindoo runner will run not only all day long, but day after day, by the side of a European traveling on horseback--enduring the travel much better than the horse, or the rider of the horse.
88) Gwendolen Trench Gascoigne was hinting at their sexual freedom when she wrote in 1896 that "Utterly unlike their miserable Mahomedan and Hindoo sisters, they enjoy absolute liberty--a liberty of which, if rumour prove true, they make ample use.
Female novelists like Phebe Gibbes in Hartly House, Calcutta (1789) and Eliza Hamilton in Translations of the Letters of a Hindoo Rajah (1796) opposed the denigration of the vegetarian other by contributing to an incipient feminist-vegetarian discourse (a discourse more explicit in the essays of contemporaries like Catharine Macaulay and Mary Hays).