Hinin

Hinin

 

(literally, nonperson), actors, geishas, beggars, and other categories of the population of feudal Japan regarded along with the eta caste as socially inferior.

References in periodicals archive ?
The types of people tabooed by this medieval ideology of shokue-shiso were the dead, and those who directly dealt with corpses, but also people with physical disabilities, people of ethnic minorities, and two groups of untouchables: eta and hinin. The eta group worked as butchers, tanners, and gravediggers, while the hinin group was made up of criminals, beggars, and lepers.
ng nd re is nnr hinin tl nic Grand Crus, trained in theWest Country by David Pipe, looks a fantasti prospect and two of the grey's three win this season have been at Cheltenham.
Cabe senalar la existencia de una clase mas en la composicion social llamada Eta o Hinin, quienes se encontraban en la parte mas baja del escalafon.
2005 yapimi film Amerikan tari hinin en buyuk boks yildizlarindan Irlanda asilli James Braddock'un gercek yasam oykusunden uyarlanmistir.
The Japanese law which concerns veil piercing is called "hinin hojinkaku," which translates as "disregarding the corporate personality." Id.
The city's hinin, Japan's lowest caste, were made to live in the area and to do the labor forbidden by the Buddhist faith--the butchering, the curing of skins--so that the wealthy could have their meat and leather, leaving the "inhuman" with the guilt of blood on their hands.
It is good to see that the author has paid attention to the social conditions of the lower classes and the social groups of 'non-people', such as the eta ('polluting' outcasts) and hinin ('non-humans'), who only enjoyed the rights and duties of other imperial subjects from 1871.
As early as the ninth century, hinin, literally "non-people," who had lost their rights of citizenship typically for failure to pay rice taxes, were struck off village registers and were thus forced to rely on a daily or short-term menial labor (Gill 2001).
It is interesting to note that during World War 11 the Allied prisoners of war were thought of as hinin by prison camp commanders who meted out cruel slave conditions to the |sub-humans' in their care.