Hippocrene


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Hippocrene

(hĭp`əkrēn'): see MusesMuses,
in Greek religion and mythology, patron goddesses of the arts, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne. Originally only three, they were later considered as nine. Calliope was the Muse of epic poetry and eloquence; Euterpe, of music or of lyric poetry; Erato, of the poetry of
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 and PegasusPegasus,
in Greek mythology, winged horse that carries the thunderbolt of Zeus. He sprang full-grown from the neck of the dying Gorgon Medusa. With a slash of his hoof, he created the Hippocrene, a sacred spring of the Muses on Mt. Helicon.
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, in mythology.

Hippocrene

Mt. Helicon spring regarded as source of poetic inspiration. [Gk. Myth.: NCE, 1246]
References in periodicals archive ?
To follow the bird in its ascent, the speaker in a Dante-like movement descends along an underground path to a garden of "embalmed darkness" (43)--there trading bacchic ecstasy for the musk rose's "dewy wine" (49), a more appropriate substitute for the nectar of "blushful Hippocrene." Through the appearance of the Rosa Moschata, poetically associated with the wild, but in fact known only through human horticulture, the poem's circle of origins--from the source of divine inspiration to the "deep-delved earth" of the grape vine--closes in what appears to be the subjugation of nature under aesthetics.
(99) Chandler, D.: The Art of Warfare in the Age of Marlborough, Nueva York, Hippocrene, 1976, pp.
Henry Morley (rpt., New York: Hippocrene Books, 1988), 28; Complete Works IV, 99; Utopia, 43.
O Hippocrene Me from her lotus heaven Saraswati Has called to regions of eternal snow And Ganges pacing to the southern sea Ganges upon whose shores the flowers of Eden blow (Songs, 1923) Limits of space debar me from presenting a full account of the author's sensitive explorations in the area of studies (hat she has undertaken so carefully and meticulously that surpass.
O for a beaker full of the warm South, Full of the true, the blushful Hippocrene, With beaded bubbles winking at the brim, And purple-stained mouth; That I might brink, and leave the world unseen, And with thee fade away into the forest dim: 3 Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget What thou among the leaves hast never known, The weariness, the fever, and the fret Here, where men sit and hear each other groan; Where palsy shakes a few, sad, last gray hairs, Where youth grows pale, and spectre-thin, and dies; Where but to think is to be full of sorrow And leaden-eyed despairs, Where Beauty cannot keep her lustrous eyes, Or new Love pine at them beyond tomorrow.
The script is then identifiable as the process of the mind transporting itself into the transcendent world of ideal nature through the power of imagination, particularly through poetry, as indicated by phrases like "Hippocrene" (I.
When not tasting, debating or discussion the delights of the "true and blushful Hippocrene" the party will enjoy a nautical weekend that includes a visit to HMS Victory and dinner at the Royal Yacht Squadron in Cowes.
Bulkin's dictionary, published by Hippocrene Books in February, uses both Dari Persian script and phonetic transcriptions.
Hippocrene. ("Sketch of the Rise and Progress of English Poetry" 14)
(22) See for more general histories of pogroms in Poland: Isaac Lewin, The Jewish Community in Poland: Historical Essays (New York: Philosophical Library, 1985); Jerome Kagan, Poland's Jewish Heritage (New York: Hippocrene Books, 1992); Margot Stern Strom, Facing History and Ourselves: The Jews of Poland (Facing History and Ourselves Foundation, Inc., Brookline, Mass., 1998).
Thou shalt believe in Milton, Dryden, Pope; Thou shalt not set up Wordsworth, Coleridge, Southey; Because the first is crazed beyond all hope, The second drunk, the third so quaint and mouthey: With Crabbe it may be difficult to cope, And Campbell's Hippocrene is somewhat drouthy: Thou shalt not steal from Samuel Rogers, nor Commit flirtation with the muse of Moore.
Finally, in what is perhaps the most dramatic link between Medusa and poetic art, the horse Pegasus is born from Medusa's decapitated head and stamps on the ground to create Hippocrene, the fountain of the Muses, to which the learned Athena pays an appreciative visit.