Hippocrene


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Hippocrene

(hĭp`əkrēn'): see MusesMuses,
in Greek religion and mythology, patron goddesses of the arts, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne. Originally only three, they were later considered as nine. Calliope was the Muse of epic poetry and eloquence; Euterpe, of music or of lyric poetry; Erato, of the poetry of
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 and PegasusPegasus,
in Greek mythology, winged horse that carries the thunderbolt of Zeus. He sprang full-grown from the neck of the dying Gorgon Medusa. With a slash of his hoof, he created the Hippocrene, a sacred spring of the Muses on Mt. Helicon.
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, in mythology.

Hippocrene

Mt. Helicon spring regarded as source of poetic inspiration. [Gk. Myth.: NCE, 1246]
References in periodicals archive ?
Werner, Gerbig, Six Months to Oblivion: The Eclipse of the Luftwaffe Fighter Force, (New York: Hippocrene Books, 1975), pp.
Yann Le Bohec, The Imperial Roman Army (New York: Hippocrene Books, and London: B.
Opposite Minerva and Arachne, Minerva at Helicon depicts the goddess visiting the magical garden where Pegasus created the Hippocrene fountain by striking the ground with his hoof (fig.
It Never Snows in September: The German View of Market Garden and the Battle of Arnhem, New York: Hippocrene Books, 1994.
For information on Gillespie and his important contributions to jazz, see Scott DeVeaux, The Birth of Bebop: A Social and Musical History (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1997); Raymond Horricks, Dizzy Gillespie and the Be-bop Revolution (New York: Hippocrene, 1984); Donald L.
This book is a revised and expanded edition of Brian Priestley's earlier biography Charlie Parker (New York: Hippocrene Books, 1984; Tunbridge Wells, England: Spellmount, 1984).
Wandycz, The Lands of Partitioned Poland, 1795-1918 (Seattle and London: University of Washington Press, 1974), 74-91, 184-86, 193-207, and Adam Zamoyski, The Polish Way (New York: Hippocrene Books, 1987; fourth printing, 1998), 309-14.
A tavern, like the Hippocrene or the Castalian spring, is a form of watering hole.
14) Alex Goldman, The Rabbi is a Lady (New York: Hippocrene, 1987), 267.
VOICES OF AMERICAN MUSLIMS By Linda Brandi Cateura Hippocrene, 279 pages, $24.
Mr Bull has drawn from the Hippocrene spring to refresh a subject than seemed stale, and his book is as witty, sexy and absorbing as his subject.
The Muse carries a pitcher under her arm and fills it completely by dipping it in the water, which arises from "deep enough" beneath the lake; linked to the Muse, this simple act evokes other mythic motifs related to inspiration, such as a veiled allusion to the spring of Hippocrene, which Levertov herself later referred to in her essay, "Horses with Wings," as "the fountain of poetic inspiration sacred to the Muses" (New and Selected Essays 112).